The Resource Democracy after the Internet : Brazil between facts, norms, and code, Samantha S. Moura Ribeiro

Democracy after the Internet : Brazil between facts, norms, and code, Samantha S. Moura Ribeiro

Label
Democracy after the Internet : Brazil between facts, norms, and code
Title
Democracy after the Internet
Title remainder
Brazil between facts, norms, and code
Statement of responsibility
Samantha S. Moura Ribeiro
Creator
Contributor
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
This book throws new light on the way in which the Internet impacts on democracy. Based on Jürgen Habermas' discourse-theoretical reconstruction of democracy, it examines one of the world's largest, most diverse but also most unequal democracies, Brazil, in terms of the broad social and legal effects the internet has had. Focusing on the Brazilian constitutional evolution, the book examines how the Internet might impact on the legitimacy of a democratic order and if, and how, it might yield opportunities for democratic empowerment. The book also assesses the ways in which law, as an institution and a system, reacts to the changes and challenges brought about by the Internet: the ways in which law may retain its strength as an integrative force, avoiding a 'virtual' legitimacy crisis.--
Member of
Is part of
Assigning source
Provided by publisher
Cataloging source
N$T
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Moura Ribeiro, Samantha S
Image bit depth
0
Index
no index present
LC call number
JL2481
LC item number
.R53 2016eb
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
SpringerLink (Online service)
Series statement
Law, governance and technology series
Series volume
volume 27
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Democracy
  • Brazil
  • Internet
  • POLITICAL SCIENCE
  • POLITICAL SCIENCE
  • POLITICAL SCIENCE
  • POLITICAL SCIENCE
  • Democracy
  • Internet
  • Politics and government
  • Brazil
  • Information retrieval
  • Jurisprudence & philosophy of law
  • Law
  • Theories of Law, Philosophy of Law, Legal History
  • Information Systems Applications (incl. Internet)
Label
Democracy after the Internet : Brazil between facts, norms, and code, Samantha S. Moura Ribeiro
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Antecedent source
mixed
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
not applicable
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Dedication; Foreword; Acknowledgements; Contents; Chapter 1: Introduction; References; Part I: Internet, Democracy, and Brazil; Chapter 2: Contextualizing What Changes; 2.1 Utopian Versus Dystopian; 2.2 The Critical Realistic Analysis; 2.2.1 The Assumption of Increased Political Participation; 2.2.2 The Problems of Individualization, Alienation and Fragmentation; 2.2.3 Polarization; 2.3 Power Shifts; 2.4 The Commodification of the Internet: From Barlow to Zittrain; References; Chapter 3: The Theoretical Framework: An Excursus; 3.1 On Habermas's Theory of Law and Democracy
  • 3.1.1 Democracy Around Discourse3.1.2 Categories of Rights; 3.2 The Co-originality and Interdependence of Private and Public Autonomy; 3.2.1 The Perspective of Developmental Autonomy as a Normative Ideal; 3.2.2 A Few Criticisms: The Inexistence of Habermas's Autonomous Actors; 3.2.3 Honneth's Moral Grammar: A Step Forward; 3.3 Reciprocal Recognition as a Basic Requirement of the Legal-Political Order and Its Main Aspects; 3.4 Law as a Vector of Social Integration and Reproduction; 3.5 Habermas Within the Scope of the Present Study
  • 3.6 The Importance of Narrowing the Analysis to One Constitutional StateReferences; Chapter 4: The Brazilian Constitutional State; 4.1 The Rise of the 1988 Brazilian Democratic Constitution: The Social-Political Context; 4.1.1 A Brief of the History of Citizenship in Brazil: We, the Brazilian People; 4.1.1.1 The Colony: We: There Is No "We"; 4.1.1.2 Independence and the First Republic: We, the Spectators; 4.1.1.3 The Provisional Government and the Estado Novo: We, Getúlio Vargas; 4.1.1.4 The First Democratic Constitution: We, the Brazilian People: A Rehearsal
  • 4.1.1.5 The Authoritarian Regime: We, the Military4.1.1.6 We, the Brazilian Citizens Under Construction; 4.1.2 Some Notes on the National Constituent Assembly; 4.1.2.1 Progressives versus Conservatives ; 4.1.3 Citizenship in the 1988 Constitution; 4.2 Habermas and the Brazilian Constitution: The Link Between Communicative and Administrative Powers; 4.3 Brief Notes on the Concepts of Formal Constitution and Material Constitution; 4.3.1 The 1988 Brazilian Constitution: Nominal or Normative?; 4.4 The Application and Interpretation of the 1988 Constitution: The Supremo Tribunal Federal (STF)
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xv, 223 pages).
File format
multiple file formats
Form of item
online
Governing access note
Access restricted to subscribing institutions
Isbn
9783319335933
Level of compression
uncompressed
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
SpringerLink
Other control number
10.1007/978-3-319-33593-3
Quality assurance targets
absent
Reformatting quality
access
Specific material designation
remote
Stock number
com.springer.onix.9783319335933
System control number
  • (OCoLC)956953658
  • (OCoLC)ocn956953658
Label
Democracy after the Internet : Brazil between facts, norms, and code, Samantha S. Moura Ribeiro
Publication
Copyright
Antecedent source
mixed
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
not applicable
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Dedication; Foreword; Acknowledgements; Contents; Chapter 1: Introduction; References; Part I: Internet, Democracy, and Brazil; Chapter 2: Contextualizing What Changes; 2.1 Utopian Versus Dystopian; 2.2 The Critical Realistic Analysis; 2.2.1 The Assumption of Increased Political Participation; 2.2.2 The Problems of Individualization, Alienation and Fragmentation; 2.2.3 Polarization; 2.3 Power Shifts; 2.4 The Commodification of the Internet: From Barlow to Zittrain; References; Chapter 3: The Theoretical Framework: An Excursus; 3.1 On Habermas's Theory of Law and Democracy
  • 3.1.1 Democracy Around Discourse3.1.2 Categories of Rights; 3.2 The Co-originality and Interdependence of Private and Public Autonomy; 3.2.1 The Perspective of Developmental Autonomy as a Normative Ideal; 3.2.2 A Few Criticisms: The Inexistence of Habermas's Autonomous Actors; 3.2.3 Honneth's Moral Grammar: A Step Forward; 3.3 Reciprocal Recognition as a Basic Requirement of the Legal-Political Order and Its Main Aspects; 3.4 Law as a Vector of Social Integration and Reproduction; 3.5 Habermas Within the Scope of the Present Study
  • 3.6 The Importance of Narrowing the Analysis to One Constitutional StateReferences; Chapter 4: The Brazilian Constitutional State; 4.1 The Rise of the 1988 Brazilian Democratic Constitution: The Social-Political Context; 4.1.1 A Brief of the History of Citizenship in Brazil: We, the Brazilian People; 4.1.1.1 The Colony: We: There Is No "We"; 4.1.1.2 Independence and the First Republic: We, the Spectators; 4.1.1.3 The Provisional Government and the Estado Novo: We, Getúlio Vargas; 4.1.1.4 The First Democratic Constitution: We, the Brazilian People: A Rehearsal
  • 4.1.1.5 The Authoritarian Regime: We, the Military4.1.1.6 We, the Brazilian Citizens Under Construction; 4.1.2 Some Notes on the National Constituent Assembly; 4.1.2.1 Progressives versus Conservatives ; 4.1.3 Citizenship in the 1988 Constitution; 4.2 Habermas and the Brazilian Constitution: The Link Between Communicative and Administrative Powers; 4.3 Brief Notes on the Concepts of Formal Constitution and Material Constitution; 4.3.1 The 1988 Brazilian Constitution: Nominal or Normative?; 4.4 The Application and Interpretation of the 1988 Constitution: The Supremo Tribunal Federal (STF)
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xv, 223 pages).
File format
multiple file formats
Form of item
online
Governing access note
Access restricted to subscribing institutions
Isbn
9783319335933
Level of compression
uncompressed
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
SpringerLink
Other control number
10.1007/978-3-319-33593-3
Quality assurance targets
absent
Reformatting quality
access
Specific material designation
remote
Stock number
com.springer.onix.9783319335933
System control number
  • (OCoLC)956953658
  • (OCoLC)ocn956953658

Library Locations

  • African Studies LibraryBorrow it
    771 Commonwealth Avenue, 6th Floor, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.350723 -71.108227
  • Alumni Medical LibraryBorrow it
    72 East Concord Street, Boston, MA, 02118, US
    42.336388 -71.072393
  • Astronomy LibraryBorrow it
    725 Commonwealth Avenue, 6th Floor, Boston, MA, 02445, US
    42.350259 -71.105717
  • Fineman and Pappas Law LibrariesBorrow it
    765 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.350979 -71.107023
  • Frederick S. Pardee Management LibraryBorrow it
    595 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.349626 -71.099547
  • Howard Gotlieb Archival Research CenterBorrow it
    771 Commonwealth Avenue, 5th Floor, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.350723 -71.108227
  • Mugar Memorial LibraryBorrow it
    771 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.350723 -71.108227
  • Music LibraryBorrow it
    771 Commonwealth Avenue, 2nd Floor, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.350723 -71.108227
  • Pikering Educational Resources LibraryBorrow it
    2 Silber Way, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.349804 -71.101425
  • School of Theology LibraryBorrow it
    745 Commonwealth Avenue, 2nd Floor, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.350494 -71.107235
  • Science & Engineering LibraryBorrow it
    38 Cummington Mall, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.348472 -71.102257
  • Stone Science LibraryBorrow it
    675 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA, 02445, US
    42.350103 -71.103784
Processing Feedback ...