The Resource Escaping poverty : the origins of modern economic growth, Peer Vries

Escaping poverty : the origins of modern economic growth, Peer Vries

Label
Escaping poverty : the origins of modern economic growth
Title
Escaping poverty
Title remainder
the origins of modern economic growth
Statement of responsibility
Peer Vries
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
  • eng
  • eng
Summary
One of the biggest debates in economic history deals with the Great Divergence. How can we explain that at a certain moment in time (the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries) a certain part of the world (the West) escaped from general poverty and became much richer than it had ever been before and than the rest of the world? Many prominent scholars discussed this question and came up with many different answers. This book provides a systematic analysis of the most important of those answers by means of an analysis of possible explanations in terms of natural resources, labour, capital, the divi
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Vries, P. H. H
Dewey number
  • 339.4
  • 339.46
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Language note
English
LC call number
HC79.P6
LC item number
V75 2013
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Poverty
  • Poverty
  • Poverty
  • China
  • Great Britain
Label
Escaping poverty : the origins of modern economic growth, Peer Vries
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Note
Description based upon print version of record
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and indexes
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Contents
  • Title Page; Copyright; Table of Contents; Body; Introduction; 1. The emergence and non-emergence of modern economic growth; 2. Taking off and falling (further) behind; 3. Two case studies: Great Britain and China in the very long eighteenth century; 4. Continuity and change, inevitability and contingency; 5. Old clichés about Asia''s economic past that are no longer tenable; 6. Income, growth and wealth: problems of measurement; 7. Industrial Revolution and Great Divergence; 8. Malthusian constraints, premodern growth and modern growth; Part one: Economists and theories of economic growth
  • 1. Introduction2. Land, resources, geography; 3. Labour: the effect of quantities; 4. Labour quality: human capital; 5. Consumption; 6. Capital and capital accumulation; 7. Specialisation and exchange; 8. Innovation; 9. Institutions: property rights, markets and states; 10. Culture and economic growth; Part two: Actual explanations of the Great Divergence; 1. The Great Divergence and geography; 2. Geography, factor endowments and institutions; 3. Geography and institutions: Britain and China, wheat versus rice; 4. Geography: town versus countryside, urbanising Great Britain and rural China
  • 5. Labour: scarcity and abundance6. Factor endowments: labour-saving Britain versus labour-absorbing China; 7. High wages and low wages: stimuli and traps?; 8. Labour-extensive and labour-intensive routes to growth?; 9. Human capital: labour and its skills; 10. Human capital: labour and discipline; 11. Consumption; 12. Accumulation, income and wealth; 13. Primitive accumulation: bullion and slaves; 14. Intercontinental trade; 15. Globalisation and Great Divergence: How the Third World came into existence; 16. Ghost acreages
  • 17. Innovation provides the key rather than accumulation or ghost acreage18. Innovation: technology and science; 19. A seriously underestimated factor: enhanced productivity because of institutional and organisational innovation; 20. Ultimate causes: institutions; 21. Markets and property rights; 22. Institutions: markets and varieties of pre-industrial capitalism; 23. Wage labour and world-system: Why it does not make sense to call Qing China capitalist and why capitalism''s origins should be considered uniquely Western; 24. Markets: sizes and characteristics
  • 25. The institution of institutions: The role of the state, in particular that of Britain26. Was industrialising Britain a developmental state?; 27. The European state system and the development of civil society: the non-monopolisation of the sources of social power; 28. Culture and growth: Western cultural exceptionalism and how to measure it; 29. Culture does make a difference. But how can one convincingly prove that?; Why not China?; A world of striking differences; Concluding comments; 1. Geography; 2. Labour and consumption; 3. Accumulation; 4. Specialisation and exchange; 5. Innovation
  • 6. Institutions: markets, property rights and states
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (516 p.)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783847001683
Media category
computer
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (EBL)1543278
  • (OCoLC)862614192
  • (SSID)ssj0001111159
  • (PQKBManifestationID)11731255
  • (PQKBTitleCode)TC0001111159
  • (PQKBWorkID)11130672
  • (PQKB)10643936
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC1543278
  • (EXLCZ)993710000000058145
Label
Escaping poverty : the origins of modern economic growth, Peer Vries
Publication
Copyright
Note
Description based upon print version of record
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and indexes
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Contents
  • Title Page; Copyright; Table of Contents; Body; Introduction; 1. The emergence and non-emergence of modern economic growth; 2. Taking off and falling (further) behind; 3. Two case studies: Great Britain and China in the very long eighteenth century; 4. Continuity and change, inevitability and contingency; 5. Old clichés about Asia''s economic past that are no longer tenable; 6. Income, growth and wealth: problems of measurement; 7. Industrial Revolution and Great Divergence; 8. Malthusian constraints, premodern growth and modern growth; Part one: Economists and theories of economic growth
  • 1. Introduction2. Land, resources, geography; 3. Labour: the effect of quantities; 4. Labour quality: human capital; 5. Consumption; 6. Capital and capital accumulation; 7. Specialisation and exchange; 8. Innovation; 9. Institutions: property rights, markets and states; 10. Culture and economic growth; Part two: Actual explanations of the Great Divergence; 1. The Great Divergence and geography; 2. Geography, factor endowments and institutions; 3. Geography and institutions: Britain and China, wheat versus rice; 4. Geography: town versus countryside, urbanising Great Britain and rural China
  • 5. Labour: scarcity and abundance6. Factor endowments: labour-saving Britain versus labour-absorbing China; 7. High wages and low wages: stimuli and traps?; 8. Labour-extensive and labour-intensive routes to growth?; 9. Human capital: labour and its skills; 10. Human capital: labour and discipline; 11. Consumption; 12. Accumulation, income and wealth; 13. Primitive accumulation: bullion and slaves; 14. Intercontinental trade; 15. Globalisation and Great Divergence: How the Third World came into existence; 16. Ghost acreages
  • 17. Innovation provides the key rather than accumulation or ghost acreage18. Innovation: technology and science; 19. A seriously underestimated factor: enhanced productivity because of institutional and organisational innovation; 20. Ultimate causes: institutions; 21. Markets and property rights; 22. Institutions: markets and varieties of pre-industrial capitalism; 23. Wage labour and world-system: Why it does not make sense to call Qing China capitalist and why capitalism''s origins should be considered uniquely Western; 24. Markets: sizes and characteristics
  • 25. The institution of institutions: The role of the state, in particular that of Britain26. Was industrialising Britain a developmental state?; 27. The European state system and the development of civil society: the non-monopolisation of the sources of social power; 28. Culture and growth: Western cultural exceptionalism and how to measure it; 29. Culture does make a difference. But how can one convincingly prove that?; Why not China?; A world of striking differences; Concluding comments; 1. Geography; 2. Labour and consumption; 3. Accumulation; 4. Specialisation and exchange; 5. Innovation
  • 6. Institutions: markets, property rights and states
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (516 p.)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783847001683
Media category
computer
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (EBL)1543278
  • (OCoLC)862614192
  • (SSID)ssj0001111159
  • (PQKBManifestationID)11731255
  • (PQKBTitleCode)TC0001111159
  • (PQKBWorkID)11130672
  • (PQKB)10643936
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC1543278
  • (EXLCZ)993710000000058145

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