The Resource Ethics in the conflicts of modernity : an essay on desire, practical reasoning, and narrative, Alasdair MacIntyre

Ethics in the conflicts of modernity : an essay on desire, practical reasoning, and narrative, Alasdair MacIntyre

Label
Ethics in the conflicts of modernity : an essay on desire, practical reasoning, and narrative
Title
Ethics in the conflicts of modernity
Title remainder
an essay on desire, practical reasoning, and narrative
Statement of responsibility
Alasdair MacIntyre
Creator
Contributor
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
"This essay is divided into five chapters. In the first the questions initially posed about our desires and how we should think about them are questions that plain non philosophical persons often find themselves asking. When however they carry their attempt to answer these questions a little further, they find that they have, perhaps inadvertently, become philosophers, and that they need some at least of the conceptual and argumentative resources which professional philosophers provide. So their enquiry, like this one, becomes philosophical. But philosophy in our culture has become an almost exclusively specialized academic discipline whose practitioners for the most part address only each other rather than the educated lay person. Moreover those same practitioners have for the last fifty years been harassed by the academic system into publishing more and more as a condition for academic survival, so that on most topics of philosophical interest there is by now an increasingly large, an often unmanageable large body of literature that has to be read as a prologue before adding to it one more item. Readers should be warned that my references to this literature are selective and few. Had I conscientiously attempted not only to find my way through all the relevant published writing in the philosophy of mind and in ethics, but then also explained how I had come to terms with the claims advanced by its authors, I would have had to write at impossible length and in a format that would have made this essay inaccessible to the lay reader for whom it is written"--
Member of
Assigning source
Provided by publisher
Cataloging source
NhCcYBP
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
MacIntyre, Alasdair C
Index
index present
LC call number
B105.D44
LC item number
M33 2016
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
ProQuest (Firm)
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Desire (Philosophy)
  • Ethics
  • Philosophy and social sciences
Label
Ethics in the conflicts of modernity : an essay on desire, practical reasoning, and narrative, Alasdair MacIntyre
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover; Half title; Title; Copyright; Epigraph; Contents; Preface; 1 Desires, Goods, and ``Good'': some philosophical issues; 1.1 Desires, why they matter, what they are; what is it to have a good reason for desiring something?; 1.2 'Good', goods, and disagreements about goods; 1.3 Expressivist accounts of 'good' and of disagreements about goods; 1.4 'Good' and goods understood in terms of human flourishing: enter Aristotle; 1.5 What is at odds between expressivists and NeoAristotelians; 1.6 Two rival characterizations of moral development
  • 1.7 Instructive conflicts between an agent's judgments and her desires: expressivists, Frankfurt, and Nietzsche1.8 The NeoAristotelian conception of the rational agent; 1.9 Expressivists versus NeoAristotelians: a philosophical conflict in which neither party seems able to defeat the other; 1.10 Why I have put on one side not only the philosophical standpoints of most recent moral philosophers, but also their moral standpoint; 2 Theory, practice, and their social contexts
  • 2.1 How to respond to the type of philosophical disagreement described in Chapter 1: the social contexts of philosophical theorizing2.2 Hume as an example: his local and particular conception of the natural and the universal; 2.3 Aristotle and his social context; Aquinas's recovery of aristotle from that context; how Aquinas seemed to have become irrelevant; 2.4 Marx, surplus value, and the explanation of Aquinas's apparent irrelevance; 2.5 Academic economics as a mode of understanding and misunderstanding; 2.6 Marxists and Distributivists as rival critics of the dominant standpoint
  • 2.7 What have we learned about how to proceed beyond the impasse of Chapter 1?3 Morality and modernity; 3.1 Morality, the morality of modernity; 3.2 The modernity in which Morality is at home; 3.3 State and market: the ethics-of-the-state and the ethics-of-the-market; 3.4 Desires, ends, and the multiplication of desires; 3.5 The structuring of desires by norms; 3.6 How and why Morality functions as it does; 3.7 Morality put in question by expressivism: the limits of an expressivist critique; 3.8 Morality put in question by Oscar Wilde; 3.9 Morality put in question by D. H. Lawrence
  • 3.10 Morality put in question by Bernard Williams3.11 Questions posed to and by Williams; 4 NeoAristotelianism developed in contemporary Thomistic terms: issues of relevance and rational justification; 4.1 Problems posed for NeoAristotelians; 4.2 Families, workplaces, and schools: common goods and conflicts; 4.3 The politics of local community and conflict: Danish and Brazilian examples; 4.4 Practical rationality from the standpoint of the dominant order; 4.5 Practical rationality from a NeoAristotelian standpoint; 4.6 The dominant conception of happiness
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource.
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781316821688
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
Stock number
99970993992
System control number
(NhCcYBP)13260889
Label
Ethics in the conflicts of modernity : an essay on desire, practical reasoning, and narrative, Alasdair MacIntyre
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover; Half title; Title; Copyright; Epigraph; Contents; Preface; 1 Desires, Goods, and ``Good'': some philosophical issues; 1.1 Desires, why they matter, what they are; what is it to have a good reason for desiring something?; 1.2 'Good', goods, and disagreements about goods; 1.3 Expressivist accounts of 'good' and of disagreements about goods; 1.4 'Good' and goods understood in terms of human flourishing: enter Aristotle; 1.5 What is at odds between expressivists and NeoAristotelians; 1.6 Two rival characterizations of moral development
  • 1.7 Instructive conflicts between an agent's judgments and her desires: expressivists, Frankfurt, and Nietzsche1.8 The NeoAristotelian conception of the rational agent; 1.9 Expressivists versus NeoAristotelians: a philosophical conflict in which neither party seems able to defeat the other; 1.10 Why I have put on one side not only the philosophical standpoints of most recent moral philosophers, but also their moral standpoint; 2 Theory, practice, and their social contexts
  • 2.1 How to respond to the type of philosophical disagreement described in Chapter 1: the social contexts of philosophical theorizing2.2 Hume as an example: his local and particular conception of the natural and the universal; 2.3 Aristotle and his social context; Aquinas's recovery of aristotle from that context; how Aquinas seemed to have become irrelevant; 2.4 Marx, surplus value, and the explanation of Aquinas's apparent irrelevance; 2.5 Academic economics as a mode of understanding and misunderstanding; 2.6 Marxists and Distributivists as rival critics of the dominant standpoint
  • 2.7 What have we learned about how to proceed beyond the impasse of Chapter 1?3 Morality and modernity; 3.1 Morality, the morality of modernity; 3.2 The modernity in which Morality is at home; 3.3 State and market: the ethics-of-the-state and the ethics-of-the-market; 3.4 Desires, ends, and the multiplication of desires; 3.5 The structuring of desires by norms; 3.6 How and why Morality functions as it does; 3.7 Morality put in question by expressivism: the limits of an expressivist critique; 3.8 Morality put in question by Oscar Wilde; 3.9 Morality put in question by D. H. Lawrence
  • 3.10 Morality put in question by Bernard Williams3.11 Questions posed to and by Williams; 4 NeoAristotelianism developed in contemporary Thomistic terms: issues of relevance and rational justification; 4.1 Problems posed for NeoAristotelians; 4.2 Families, workplaces, and schools: common goods and conflicts; 4.3 The politics of local community and conflict: Danish and Brazilian examples; 4.4 Practical rationality from the standpoint of the dominant order; 4.5 Practical rationality from a NeoAristotelian standpoint; 4.6 The dominant conception of happiness
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource.
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781316821688
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
Stock number
99970993992
System control number
(NhCcYBP)13260889

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