The Resource Food and Agricultural Imports from China, Geoffrey S. Becker

Food and Agricultural Imports from China, Geoffrey S. Becker

Label
Food and Agricultural Imports from China
Title
Food and Agricultural Imports from China
Statement of responsibility
Geoffrey S. Becker
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
EJB
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Becker, Geoffrey S
Government publication
federal national government publication
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
NAL call number
HF3005
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Library of Congress
Series statement
CRS report for Congress
Series volume
RL34080
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Produce trade
  • Imports
  • Food
  • Consumer protection
  • Consumer protection
  • Food
  • Imports
  • Produce trade
  • China
  • United States
Label
Food and Agricultural Imports from China, Geoffrey S. Becker
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • "Updated September 26, 2008."
  • "Order code RL34080."
  • Title from title screen (viewed Oct. 10, 2008)
  • China is now the third largest source of U.S. agricultural and seafood imports. A series of incidents have raised public concerns about the safety of these products. In September 2008, U.S. authorities said they broadened their testing of milk-derived products from China, following reports that melamine-contaminated baby formula has sickened tens of thousands of Chinese children. They also announced a recall of some coffee products that may contain melamine. Early in 2007, evidence emerged that adulterated pet food ingredients from China had caused the deaths of a large number of dogs and cats. In late June 2007, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced that it was detaining all imports of farm-raised seafood from China until shippers could confirm they are free of unapproved drug residues. U.S. imports of Chinese agricultural and seafood products increased roughly fourfold, from 433,000 metric tons (MT) and $1 billion in 1997 to 2.1 million MT and $4.9 billion in 2007. However, the United States exported a much larger volume of these products to China in 2007: 14.7 million MT, valued at $8.8 billion. Two federal agencies -- FDA and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA's) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) -- are primarily responsible for the government's food regulatory system, although a number of other federal, state, and local agencies also have important roles. For imports, FSIS (which regulates the safety of most meat and poultry) relies on a very different regulatory system than FDA (which regulates the safety of all other foods). Although all imported food products must meet the same safety standards as domestically produced foods, international trade rules permit a foreign country to apply its own, differing, regulatory authorities and institutional systems in meeting such standards, under an internationally recognized concept known as "equivalence." China officials assert that they have been moving aggressively to improve their food safety system and to close unsafe plants. China in late 2007 concluded a memorandum of agreement with the United States aimed at improving the safety of traded food and feed products. Nonetheless, some Members of Congress continue to express sharp criticism of both China's food safety record and U.S. efforts to insure import safety. In the 110th Congress, committees on both sides of Capitol Hill held hearings on food safety concerns generally and on the China situation. Numerous bills were introduced focusing on imported food safety or containing such provisions, which would apply equally to Chinese imports. These bills include H.R. 2997, S. 1776, H.R. 1148/S. 654, H.R. 2108/S. 1274, H.R. 3100, H.R. 3610, H.R. 3624, H.R. 3937, H.R. 3967, and S. 2418. A provision in the FDA Amendments Act of 2007 (P.L. 110-85), passed in September 2007, requires an annual report to Congress with detailed data on FDA-regulated food imports. Also in 2007, Congress cleared a consolidated appropriation act for FY2008 which includes a provision blocking an FSIS rule to allow certain poultry products to be imported from China
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
mixed
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
[24]
Form of item
online
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Note
Hein Online
Other physical details
digital, PDF file.
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (OCoLC)261480607
  • (OCoLC)ocn261480607
System details
  • Mode of access: World Wide Web
  • System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader
Label
Food and Agricultural Imports from China, Geoffrey S. Becker
Publication
Note
  • "Updated September 26, 2008."
  • "Order code RL34080."
  • Title from title screen (viewed Oct. 10, 2008)
  • China is now the third largest source of U.S. agricultural and seafood imports. A series of incidents have raised public concerns about the safety of these products. In September 2008, U.S. authorities said they broadened their testing of milk-derived products from China, following reports that melamine-contaminated baby formula has sickened tens of thousands of Chinese children. They also announced a recall of some coffee products that may contain melamine. Early in 2007, evidence emerged that adulterated pet food ingredients from China had caused the deaths of a large number of dogs and cats. In late June 2007, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced that it was detaining all imports of farm-raised seafood from China until shippers could confirm they are free of unapproved drug residues. U.S. imports of Chinese agricultural and seafood products increased roughly fourfold, from 433,000 metric tons (MT) and $1 billion in 1997 to 2.1 million MT and $4.9 billion in 2007. However, the United States exported a much larger volume of these products to China in 2007: 14.7 million MT, valued at $8.8 billion. Two federal agencies -- FDA and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA's) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) -- are primarily responsible for the government's food regulatory system, although a number of other federal, state, and local agencies also have important roles. For imports, FSIS (which regulates the safety of most meat and poultry) relies on a very different regulatory system than FDA (which regulates the safety of all other foods). Although all imported food products must meet the same safety standards as domestically produced foods, international trade rules permit a foreign country to apply its own, differing, regulatory authorities and institutional systems in meeting such standards, under an internationally recognized concept known as "equivalence." China officials assert that they have been moving aggressively to improve their food safety system and to close unsafe plants. China in late 2007 concluded a memorandum of agreement with the United States aimed at improving the safety of traded food and feed products. Nonetheless, some Members of Congress continue to express sharp criticism of both China's food safety record and U.S. efforts to insure import safety. In the 110th Congress, committees on both sides of Capitol Hill held hearings on food safety concerns generally and on the China situation. Numerous bills were introduced focusing on imported food safety or containing such provisions, which would apply equally to Chinese imports. These bills include H.R. 2997, S. 1776, H.R. 1148/S. 654, H.R. 2108/S. 1274, H.R. 3100, H.R. 3610, H.R. 3624, H.R. 3937, H.R. 3967, and S. 2418. A provision in the FDA Amendments Act of 2007 (P.L. 110-85), passed in September 2007, requires an annual report to Congress with detailed data on FDA-regulated food imports. Also in 2007, Congress cleared a consolidated appropriation act for FY2008 which includes a provision blocking an FSIS rule to allow certain poultry products to be imported from China
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
mixed
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
[24]
Form of item
online
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Note
Hein Online
Other physical details
digital, PDF file.
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (OCoLC)261480607
  • (OCoLC)ocn261480607
System details
  • Mode of access: World Wide Web
  • System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader

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