The Resource Israel's Wisdom literature; : its bearing on theology and the history of religion, [by] O.S. Rankin

Israel's Wisdom literature; : its bearing on theology and the history of religion, [by] O.S. Rankin

Label
Israel's Wisdom literature; : its bearing on theology and the history of religion
Title
Israel's Wisdom literature;
Title remainder
its bearing on theology and the history of religion
Statement of responsibility
[by] O.S. Rankin
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Rankin, Oliver Shaw
Index
index present
LC call number
BS1455
LC item number
.R27 1969
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Wisdom literature
  • Reward (Theology)
  • Immortality
  • Judaism
  • Littérature sapientiale
  • Judaïsme
  • Rétribution (Théologie)
  • Immortalité
  • Jodendom
  • Joodse boeken
Label
Israel's Wisdom literature; : its bearing on theology and the history of religion, [by] O.S. Rankin
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Reprint of the 1936 ed
Bibliography note
Bibliographical footnotes
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Chapter 1: The wisdom literature, the documents of Hebrew humanism. God as Creator and the emergent problems -- The sense in which the wisdom literature may be called the documents of Hebrew humanism -- The origin of this humanism; the international character of the wisdom-(maxim)-writings -- 1. God as Creator; individualistic and universalistic thought -- 2. The question of divine and human responsibility; theodicy -- The contribution of the Wisdom-writings to theodicy -- the limitations of human reason -- Luther, Calvin, Kant -- The probationary and pedagogical theories of suffering -- The question: When evil derives? Satan -- dualistic thought -- The nature of man; Sirach and the evil propensity; man's free-will; the doctrine of predestination -- The influence of Judaism on Christian theodicy; St. Augustine's teaching of free-will. The source of sin not in matter but in the will. Exculpating the Creator -- The world is a good world. Sirach and the harmony of the cosmos. The theory of opposites. Leibniz's theodicy -- 3. The subject of Providence -- Hebrew and Egyptian nature hymns; the Creator and His creatures; the part the Wisdom-school takes in the development of the doctrine of providence -- What addition did Christianity make to the Jewish conception of providence, in respect to God's relationship to man/ Jesus' teaching, the "universalism" of Jesus' teaching. The new element in Jesus' teaching. The historical results of this new element -- Chapter 2: The ideas of individual responsibility and of reward and retribution in the Old Testament -- Does religious individualism only emerge in the days of Jeremiah? -- Solidarity of the person with the tribe. Achan. Super-individuality -- Evidence of an early primitive religious individualism. Magical formulae and instructions of the priests -- Individualism in the ancient sagas and in the historical records -- The ancient legislature, its ideas of individual responsibility and of personal rights. The Book of the Covenant -- The nature of the individualism of the earliest Hebrew maxim collections -- The prophetic school and the wisdom-school: the question of contact in regard to teaching of divine recompense -- The notion of individual responsibility in Greek thought and in the general history of ethics -- Chapter III: Theories of reward and retribution in the Old Testament and in later Judaism -- The Deuteronomist theory of reward. Development of this by the chronicler -- The optimism of the Deuteronomist theory; its elasticity; its appendices or adjuncts -- Ezekiel's "atomistic mechanical" doctrine of reward and its results -- Modification of the eudaemonism of Deuteronomist teaching: Second Isaiah; Psalm 73 -- The dialogue of Job does not question the general validity of the Deuteronomist theory -- The Deuteronomist theory is rejected by Qoheleth, but maintains its place in the belief of Judaism. The contribution of Qoheleth
  • Chapter IV: The development of the Deuteronomist theory in later Judaism -- The teaching that "virtue is its own reward" arises in Judaism. This teaching is occasional but not accidental. The reasons for its remaining occasional in Judaism and in Christianity. -- The influence of the belief in a future life upon the Deuteronomist theory. -- Rabbinic Judaism harmonizes the Deuteronomist this-worldly ethic with the belief in an after-life by teaching that present sufferings are a means of atonement for sin. The ideas which lead up to this doctrine. Traces of it in the Gospel and in St. Paul's Epistles -- Chapter V: The belief in a future life -- its growth and development in Israel -- 1. Forms of the belief in non-Palestinian sources and in 1 Enoch -- 2. The development of eschatological ideas in the prophetic books -- Two forms of belief -- resurrection (Dan 12:2) and immortality immediately after death (Wisdom of Solomon; 4 Macc.). Judaism and Christianity as confronted with these two forms -- 3. Jewish doctrine of a resurrection probably of Iranian origin; and the notion that the soul ascends to heaven (Dan 12:3; Qoh. 3:21) a belief of Chaldean astral religion. Hellenic influence later
  • Chapter VI. The belief in a future life -- the question of its appearance in Job and the "Job-Psalms" (Ps. 73 and 49) -- 1. Personal communion of man with the Deity -- Consideration of Job, ch 19:25f -- 2. Psalm 73:15-18, 23-26; the significance of the phrase, "Sanctuaries of El"; the meaning of kabod and laqach in Ps. 73 and elsewhere -- Psalm 49:16 -- Chapter VII: An inquiry into the reason of the lateness of the development in Israel of a belief in a future life. (Resistance to the idea in pre-exilic Israel) -- Israel was acquainted with the fact that belief in a future life was held elsewhere, e.g. by the Egyptians -- Oesterley's view that the Sheol belief was adopted to counter the practice of necromancy. This view is untenable -- The attenuation of the Sheol conception -- The significance of the Jahvistic view (Gen. 2) of man's nature -- The belief in Jahve as Heaven-god was unfavourable to the early development of belief in an after-life. Comparison of the Hebrew Jahve and the Greek Zeus. An analogy from Greek religion. Zeus (the Sky-god) opposes the nature-divinities -- The Adonis-worship and the Adonis-myth were known to early Israel. The concept of dying and rising deities -- Resistance of Jahvism to the Baal religion, that is, to the fertility-cults -- Babylonian religion also unfavourable to mystery-cults -- Chapter VIII: Post-exilic monotheism and the idea of immortality -- 1. The concept of Jahve's transcendence and His relationship to Nature. As Artifex or Creator He is above nature. With the nature-religion was associated the doctrine of immortality -- The great nature festivals become commemorative of historical events -- Resurrection not associated with a nature-drama but with the drama of the consummation of history in Dan. 12 -- Natural theology was overcome in Judaism before acquaintance with the Greek mysteries was made -- 2. The resistance which the Deuteronomist doctrine of reward and providence offered to the idea of immortality -- Chapter IX: The figure of wisdom -- 1. The growth of belief in intermediary beings -- Bltmann and Schraeder on the Logos of the Fourth Gospel -- 2. Views concerning the origin of the Figure of Wisdom -- Female deities as associates of Jahve; Elephantine -- 3. Personifications of divine attributes or powers in Babylonia and Egypt, Deities of Wisdom, knowledge, truth, exc -- 4. The view that personified Wisdom arose from Hebrew mythology -- A Paradise-myth -- 5. Wisdom in Job 28:23f, Prov. 8:22f, 8:4f, 9:1f -- The intermediaries in Persian religious belief -- The Jewish Wisdom and the Iranian Asha (Law) -- The seven pillars of Wisdom. Babylonian mythology -- Judaism and borrowing -- 6. Wisdom in the Hellenistic age identified with the Law of Moses. Other features. Isis-Sophia. Dike -- The strange (foreign) women of Prov. 1 -- 9; Wisdom as compensation for Ishtar. The debt of Judaism to Chaldean-Iranian religion
Dimensions
21 cm
Extent
xvi, 270 pages
Lccn
69019620
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (OCoLC)00006359
  • (OCoLC)ocm00006359
Label
Israel's Wisdom literature; : its bearing on theology and the history of religion, [by] O.S. Rankin
Publication
Note
Reprint of the 1936 ed
Bibliography note
Bibliographical footnotes
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Chapter 1: The wisdom literature, the documents of Hebrew humanism. God as Creator and the emergent problems -- The sense in which the wisdom literature may be called the documents of Hebrew humanism -- The origin of this humanism; the international character of the wisdom-(maxim)-writings -- 1. God as Creator; individualistic and universalistic thought -- 2. The question of divine and human responsibility; theodicy -- The contribution of the Wisdom-writings to theodicy -- the limitations of human reason -- Luther, Calvin, Kant -- The probationary and pedagogical theories of suffering -- The question: When evil derives? Satan -- dualistic thought -- The nature of man; Sirach and the evil propensity; man's free-will; the doctrine of predestination -- The influence of Judaism on Christian theodicy; St. Augustine's teaching of free-will. The source of sin not in matter but in the will. Exculpating the Creator -- The world is a good world. Sirach and the harmony of the cosmos. The theory of opposites. Leibniz's theodicy -- 3. The subject of Providence -- Hebrew and Egyptian nature hymns; the Creator and His creatures; the part the Wisdom-school takes in the development of the doctrine of providence -- What addition did Christianity make to the Jewish conception of providence, in respect to God's relationship to man/ Jesus' teaching, the "universalism" of Jesus' teaching. The new element in Jesus' teaching. The historical results of this new element -- Chapter 2: The ideas of individual responsibility and of reward and retribution in the Old Testament -- Does religious individualism only emerge in the days of Jeremiah? -- Solidarity of the person with the tribe. Achan. Super-individuality -- Evidence of an early primitive religious individualism. Magical formulae and instructions of the priests -- Individualism in the ancient sagas and in the historical records -- The ancient legislature, its ideas of individual responsibility and of personal rights. The Book of the Covenant -- The nature of the individualism of the earliest Hebrew maxim collections -- The prophetic school and the wisdom-school: the question of contact in regard to teaching of divine recompense -- The notion of individual responsibility in Greek thought and in the general history of ethics -- Chapter III: Theories of reward and retribution in the Old Testament and in later Judaism -- The Deuteronomist theory of reward. Development of this by the chronicler -- The optimism of the Deuteronomist theory; its elasticity; its appendices or adjuncts -- Ezekiel's "atomistic mechanical" doctrine of reward and its results -- Modification of the eudaemonism of Deuteronomist teaching: Second Isaiah; Psalm 73 -- The dialogue of Job does not question the general validity of the Deuteronomist theory -- The Deuteronomist theory is rejected by Qoheleth, but maintains its place in the belief of Judaism. The contribution of Qoheleth
  • Chapter IV: The development of the Deuteronomist theory in later Judaism -- The teaching that "virtue is its own reward" arises in Judaism. This teaching is occasional but not accidental. The reasons for its remaining occasional in Judaism and in Christianity. -- The influence of the belief in a future life upon the Deuteronomist theory. -- Rabbinic Judaism harmonizes the Deuteronomist this-worldly ethic with the belief in an after-life by teaching that present sufferings are a means of atonement for sin. The ideas which lead up to this doctrine. Traces of it in the Gospel and in St. Paul's Epistles -- Chapter V: The belief in a future life -- its growth and development in Israel -- 1. Forms of the belief in non-Palestinian sources and in 1 Enoch -- 2. The development of eschatological ideas in the prophetic books -- Two forms of belief -- resurrection (Dan 12:2) and immortality immediately after death (Wisdom of Solomon; 4 Macc.). Judaism and Christianity as confronted with these two forms -- 3. Jewish doctrine of a resurrection probably of Iranian origin; and the notion that the soul ascends to heaven (Dan 12:3; Qoh. 3:21) a belief of Chaldean astral religion. Hellenic influence later
  • Chapter VI. The belief in a future life -- the question of its appearance in Job and the "Job-Psalms" (Ps. 73 and 49) -- 1. Personal communion of man with the Deity -- Consideration of Job, ch 19:25f -- 2. Psalm 73:15-18, 23-26; the significance of the phrase, "Sanctuaries of El"; the meaning of kabod and laqach in Ps. 73 and elsewhere -- Psalm 49:16 -- Chapter VII: An inquiry into the reason of the lateness of the development in Israel of a belief in a future life. (Resistance to the idea in pre-exilic Israel) -- Israel was acquainted with the fact that belief in a future life was held elsewhere, e.g. by the Egyptians -- Oesterley's view that the Sheol belief was adopted to counter the practice of necromancy. This view is untenable -- The attenuation of the Sheol conception -- The significance of the Jahvistic view (Gen. 2) of man's nature -- The belief in Jahve as Heaven-god was unfavourable to the early development of belief in an after-life. Comparison of the Hebrew Jahve and the Greek Zeus. An analogy from Greek religion. Zeus (the Sky-god) opposes the nature-divinities -- The Adonis-worship and the Adonis-myth were known to early Israel. The concept of dying and rising deities -- Resistance of Jahvism to the Baal religion, that is, to the fertility-cults -- Babylonian religion also unfavourable to mystery-cults -- Chapter VIII: Post-exilic monotheism and the idea of immortality -- 1. The concept of Jahve's transcendence and His relationship to Nature. As Artifex or Creator He is above nature. With the nature-religion was associated the doctrine of immortality -- The great nature festivals become commemorative of historical events -- Resurrection not associated with a nature-drama but with the drama of the consummation of history in Dan. 12 -- Natural theology was overcome in Judaism before acquaintance with the Greek mysteries was made -- 2. The resistance which the Deuteronomist doctrine of reward and providence offered to the idea of immortality -- Chapter IX: The figure of wisdom -- 1. The growth of belief in intermediary beings -- Bltmann and Schraeder on the Logos of the Fourth Gospel -- 2. Views concerning the origin of the Figure of Wisdom -- Female deities as associates of Jahve; Elephantine -- 3. Personifications of divine attributes or powers in Babylonia and Egypt, Deities of Wisdom, knowledge, truth, exc -- 4. The view that personified Wisdom arose from Hebrew mythology -- A Paradise-myth -- 5. Wisdom in Job 28:23f, Prov. 8:22f, 8:4f, 9:1f -- The intermediaries in Persian religious belief -- The Jewish Wisdom and the Iranian Asha (Law) -- The seven pillars of Wisdom. Babylonian mythology -- Judaism and borrowing -- 6. Wisdom in the Hellenistic age identified with the Law of Moses. Other features. Isis-Sophia. Dike -- The strange (foreign) women of Prov. 1 -- 9; Wisdom as compensation for Ishtar. The debt of Judaism to Chaldean-Iranian religion
Dimensions
21 cm
Extent
xvi, 270 pages
Lccn
69019620
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (OCoLC)00006359
  • (OCoLC)ocm00006359

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