The Resource Law reform in plural societies, Teleiai Lalotoa Mulitalo Ropinisone Silipa Seumanutafa

Law reform in plural societies, Teleiai Lalotoa Mulitalo Ropinisone Silipa Seumanutafa

Label
Law reform in plural societies
Title
Law reform in plural societies
Statement of responsibility
Teleiai Lalotoa Mulitalo Ropinisone Silipa Seumanutafa
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
This book asserts that the Pacific Islands continue to struggle with the colonial legacy of plural legal systems, comprising laws and legal institutions from both the common law and the customary legal system. It also investigates the extent to which customary principles and values are accommodated in legislation. Focusing on Samoa, the author argues that South Pacific countries continue to adopt a Western approach to law reform without considering legal pluralism, which often results in laws which are unsuitable and irrelevant to Samoa. In the context of this system of law making, effective law reform in Samoa can only be achieved where the law reform process recognises the legitimacy of the two primary legal systems. The book goes on to present a law reform process that is more relevant and suitable for law making in the Pacific Islands or any post-colonial societies
Member of
Cataloging source
EBLCP
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1969-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Mulitalo Ropinisone Silipa Seumanutafa, Teleiai Lalotoa
Index
no index present
LC call number
KWW46.8
LC item number
.M85 2018
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Series statement
The world of small states
Series volume
v. 2
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Law reform
  • Law reform
  • Legal polycentricity
  • LAW
  • LAW
  • LAW
  • LAW
  • LAW
  • LAW
  • Law reform
  • Legal polycentricity
  • Oceania
  • Samoa
Label
Law reform in plural societies, Teleiai Lalotoa Mulitalo Ropinisone Silipa Seumanutafa
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction -- 1.1. Divergent Currents -- 1.2. Geographical Context -- 1.3. Legal Pluralism and Law Reform -- 1.4. Overview -- References -- 2. Law Reform and Legal Pluralism Developments -- 2.1. Law Reform -- 2.1.1. Development of Law Reform Institutions and Agents -- 2.1.2. More Recent Developments -- 2.1.3. Legal Transplantation -- 2.1.4. Attempts to Recognise Customary Laws in State Laws -- 2.1.4.1. Codification of Customary Laws -- 2.1.4.2. Restatement of Customary Laws -- 2.1.4.3. Incorporation of Customary Laws by Reference -- 2.2. Law Reform Commissions (LRCS) and Legal Professions of the Pacific Islands -- 2.2.1. Proposal for a Regional Law Reform Commission -- 2.2.2. The Legal Profession -- 2.3. Legal Pluralism -- 2.3.1. Old Legal Pluralism, Colonial and Postcolonial Pluralism -- 2.3.2. New and Postmodern Pluralism -- 2.3.3. Other Categories of Legal Pluralism -- 2.4. Legal Pluralism in the Pacific Islands -- 2.4.1. Legal Pluralism in the Pacific Islands -- 2.4.2. Regional and Local Jurisprudence -- 2.4.3.A New Approach To Examining The Customary Law and State Law Divide -- 2.5. Overview -- References -- 3.A Research Methodology for the Pacific -- 3.1. Indigenous and Pacific Research Methodologies -- 3.1.1. Postcolonial Research Methodologies -- 3.1.2. Pacific Specific Methodologies -- 3.1.3. 'Talanoa' Research Methodology -- 3.2. Utilising Pacific Research Methodologies to Resolve Indigenous and Pacific Issues -- 3.2.1.'Talanoa' and Ethical Interview Principles -- 3.2.2. Analysing 'Talanoa' Interviews -- 3.2.3. Pacific Islands Legislative Drafters Survey -- 3.3. Primary Material and Documentary Data -- 3.3.1. Court Judgments and Hansard Reports -- 3.3.2.Commission of Inquiry Reports -- 3.3.3. National Reports -- 3.3.4. Local Newspaper Research: The Samoa Observer -- 3.4. Overview -- References -- 4. The Value of Law Reform: Social and Cultural -- 4.1. The Ideological Principles Behind Law Making: Customary Laws and State Laws -- 4.1.1. Social Views on Law Reform -- 4.1.2. Limited Understanding of State Laws -- 4.1.3. Lack of Formal Education -- 4.1.4. Relevance to Village Life -- 4.1.5. Cultural Factors -- 4.1.6. Language Barriers -- 4.1.7. Support from Secondary Data: Local Newspaper Research -- 4.1.8. Challenges to Address -- 4.2. Demand for Customs and Respect for the Constitution -- 4.2.1. Customary Laws as the Basis of the Legal System -- 4.2.2. Laws in the Samoan Context -- 4.2.3. Respect for the Constitution -- 4.2.4. Challenges to Address -- 4.3. Should Customs be Codified in Samoa's Laws? -- 4.3.1. Opposition to Codification -- 4.3.1.1. Conflicting Values -- 4.3.1.2. Flexibility -- 4.3.1.3. Ascertainment and Uniformity -- 4.3.1.4. Serving the Interests of Non-Locals Only -- 4.3.1.5. Absence of Customary Structures to Support Customs in Legislation -- 4.3.1.6. Difficulties for Legislative Drafters -- 4.3.1.7. Secondary Data: Pacific Legislative Drafters Survey -- 4.3.2. Benefits of Codification -- 4.3.2.1. Certainty and Constitutional Compliance -- 4.4. Emerging Conceptual Challenges -- 4.4.1. Understanding the Dichotomy -- 4.4.2. Need to Promote Understanding of State Laws -- 4.4.3. Customs to be Recognised in State Laws -- 4.4.4. Emerging Acceptance of Modern Laws -- 4.4.5. Interdependency -- References -- 5. State Focused Law Reform: Constitutional Offices, Institutions and Agents -- 5.1. The Courts -- 5.1.1. Jurisdiction on Customs -- 5.1.2. Judicial Training -- 5.1.3. Role of the Judiciary in Law Reform -- 5.1.4. Expatriate Judges -- 5.1.4.1. General Pacific Experiences -- 5.1.4.2. Interpretive Function of the Court -- 5.1.4.3. Village Agreement Unenforceable Under Contract Law -- 5.1.4.4. Obiter Unsupported by Local Realities -- 5.1.5. Overview: The Courts -- 5.2. The Parliament -- 5.2.1. Lack of Systems in Place to Support Assembly of Matai -- 5.2.1.1. Language in Parliamentary Proceedings -- 5.2.1.2. Law Making Procedures: Assembly Process and Private Members Bills -- 5.2.2. Unsuccessful Legal Transplants -- 5.2.3. Acts of Parliament with Custom References 1962 -- 2015 (Samoa) -- 5.2.3.1. Acts 1962 (Independence) to 1989 -- 5.2.3.2. Acts from 1990 to 2000 -- 5.2.3.3. Acts After 2000 -- 5.2.3.4. Overview -- 5.2.4. Analysis: Acts of Parliament and Acts with Customs References (2008 -- 2016) -- 5.2.5. Overview: The Parliament -- 5.3. The Executive -- 5.3.1. Executive Law Making Process -- 5.3.1.1. Cabinet Handbook -- 5.3.1.2. Legislative Drafting Handbook -- 5.3.2. Overview: The Executive -- 5.4. The Samoa Law Reform Commission (SLRC) -- 5.4.1. Establishment and Personnel -- 5.4.1.1. What Model of Law Reform Institution? -- 5.4.1.2. The Initial Years -- 5.4.1.3. Western Educated Personnel -- 5.4.1.4. The SLRC Advisory Board -- 5.4.2. Law Reform Process -- 5.4.3. Public Consultation -- 5.4.3.1. Costly Cultural Protocols -- 5.4.3.2. Law Reform Consultation -- 5.4.4. Overview: The SLRC -- 5.5. Other Law Reform Agents -- 5.5.1.Commissions of Inquiry (COI) -- 5.5.1.1. COIs for Customary Reforms -- 5.5.1.2. COI Investigations and Reforms to Date -- 5.5.1.3. COI Strengths -- 5.5.1.4. COI Challenges -- 5.5.1.5. Law Reform Driven by Both Matais (Customary) and Lawyers (Modem) -- 5.5.2. The Samoa Law Society (SLS) -- 5.5.2.1. Law Reform Functions -- 5.5.2.2. Challenges -- 5.5.3. Office of the Ombudsman -- 5.5.3.1. Law Reform Functions -- 5.5.3.2. Challenges -- 5.5.4. Non-Government Organisations (NGOs) -- 5.5.4.1. Law Reform Influence -- 5.5.4.2. Challenges -- 5.6. Emerging Conceptual Challenges -- 5.6.1. Law Reform Framework Not Embedded in Customs -- 5.6.1.1. Laws Authorising Law Making -- 5.6.1.2. Procedures Guiding Law Making -- 5.6.2. Limited Professional Training Opportunities -- 5.6.3. Involving the Village Structures in the Law Reform Process -- 5.6.4. Funding Constraints -- References
  • 5.4.3.2. Law Reform Consultation -- 5.4.4. Overview: The SLRC -- 5.5. Other Law Reform Agents -- 5.5.1.Commissions of Inquiry (COI) -- 5.5.1.1. COIs for Customary Reforms -- 5.5.1.2. COI Investigations and Reforms to Date -- 5.5.1.3. COI Strengths -- 5.5.1.4. COI Challenges -- 5.5.1.5. Law Reform Driven by Both Matais (Customary) and Lawyers (Modem) -- 5.5.2. The Samoa Law Society (SLS) -- 5.5.2.1. Law Reform Functions -- 5.5.2.2. Challenges -- 5.5.3. Office of the Ombudsman -- 5.5.3.1. Law Reform Functions -- 5.5.3.2. Challenges -- 5.5.4. Non-Government Organisations (NGOs) -- 5.5.4.1. Law Reform Influence -- 5.5.4.2. Challenges -- 5.6. Emerging Conceptual Challenges -- 5.6.1. Law Reform Framework Not Embedded in Customs -- 5.6.1.1. Laws Authorising Law Making -- 5.6.1.2. Procedures Guiding Law Making -- 5.6.2. Limited Professional Training Opportunities -- 5.6.3. Involving the Village Structures in the Law Reform Process -- 5.6.4. Funding Constraints -- References -- 6. Towards Responsive Law Reform -- 6.1. Public Awareness of State Laws -- 6.1.1. Develop Community Awareness -- 6.1.2. Facilitate Public Access to Acts and Court Decisions -- 6.2. Professional Training: Judiciary, Parliament, Legal Profession -- 6.2.1. The Judiciary -- 6.2.1.1. Judicial Training -- 6.2.1.2. Judicial Guidance Clause -- 6.2.1.3. Code of Judicial Conduct -- 6.2.1.4. Court Benchbooks -- 6.2.1.5. New Developments in the Courts of Samoa -- 6.2.2. Parliament -- 6.2.2.1. Professional Training -- 6.2.2.2. Customary Duties to Village Communities -- 6.2.2.3. Private Members Bill (PMB) -- 6.2.2.4. Recent Developments for Parliament -- 6.2.3. Legal Profession -- 6.2.3.1. Professional Training on the Rule of Law and Samoan Customs -- 6.2.3.2. Training on Samoan Language and Cultural Protocols -- 6.2.3.3. Engaging in Academic Conferences and Quality Research -- 6.3. State Responsibilities in Law Reform -- 6.3.1. Constitutional and Legislative Review, Drafting Handbooks -- 6.3.1.1. Reference Guide to Customary Practices -- 6.3.1.2. Village Fono Act (1990) Review -- 6.3.1.3. Cabinet and Drafting Handbooks -- 6.3.2. Promote Formal Education -- 6.3.3. National Plans -- 6.3.3.1. Samoa's National Plan 2012 -- 2016 -- 6.3.3.2. Law and Justice Sector Plan -- 6.4. Village Responsibilities in Law Reform -- 6.4.1. Change of Village Mayor Criteria -- 6.4.2. Develop Constitutionally Compliant Village Rules -- 6.5. Managing Funding Constraints -- 6.5.1. Involving Customary Structures in Law Reform Consultation -- 6.5.2. Prioritising and Justifying Costs for Customary Reforms -- 6.6. Local Jurisprudence: Customary Law as the Basis of Common Law -- 6.7. Legislative Drafters and Draft Laws -- 6.7.1. Pacific Specific Drafting and Law Reform Training -- 6.7.2. Drafting in the Samoan Language, Legislative References, Context -- 6.7.3. Review of Draft Laws for Customary Compliance -- 6.8. Summary of Responses to Legal Pluralism -- References -- 7.A Suitable Law Reform Framework for Pluralist Countries -- 7.1. Introduction -- 7.2.A Suitable Law Reform Process for Samoa -- 7.2.1. Before the Terms of Reference (TOR) -- 7.2.1.1. Step 1 -- 7.2.2. After a TOR is Received by the SLRC -- 7.2.2.1. Step 2: Research and Consultation -- 7.2.2.1.1. Doctrinal Research -- 7.2.2.1.2. Socio-Legal Research -- 7.2.2.2. Step 3: Issues Paper -- 7.2.2.3. Step 4: Research and Consultation -- 7.2.2.4. Step 5: Final Report with Recommendations -- 7.2.2.5. Step 6: Report Tabled in Parliament -- 7.2.3. The Draft Bill Process -- 7.2.3.1. Legislative Drafting -- 7.2.3.2. Vetting for Customary Compliance -- 7.2.3.3. Passage Through Parliament -- 7.2.4. Law Reform Process of Law Reform Agents -- 7.2.4.1.Commissions of Inquiry, Ombudsman, NGOs -- 7.3. Legislative Reforms and Guides -- 7.3.1. Local Jurisprudence -- 7.3.2. Judicial Clause and Guides -- 7.3.2.1. Constitutional Amendment -- 7.3.2.2. Code of Judicial Conduct -- 7.3.2.3. Court Benchbooks -- 7.3.3. Reference Guide to Customary Practices -- 7.3.4. Parliament Guides and Procedures -- 7.3.4.1. Guide for Members of Parliament -- 7.3.4.2. Standing Orders of Parliament -- 7.3.4.3. State Handbooks -- 7.3.4.3.1. Cabinet Handbook -- 7.3.4.3.2. Legislative Drafting Handbook of Samoa -- 7.3.5. Statutory Obligation to Consider Customs -- 7.4. Conclusions -- 7.4.1. Systematic Studies on Law Reform -- 7.4.2. The Challenges of Legal Pluralism for Law Reform in Samoa -- 7.4.3. Taking Advantage of Pluralism -- 7.4.4. Emerging Trends -- 7.4.4.1.A Winning Model? -- 7.4.4.2. Incorporation by Reference -- 7.4.4.3. State Initiatives that Accommodate Pluralism -- 7.5. Future Research -- 7.5.1. Constitutional Review -- 7.5.2. Local Jurisprudence -- 7.5.3. Pacific Island Specific Research -- 7.5.4. Samoa's Constitutional Compliant Village Rules -- 7.5.5. Follow up Research on Legal Pluralism and Law Reform in Samoa -- 7.5.6. Pacific Research Methodologies -- 7.5.7. Professional Training that Addresses Customs -- References -- Appendices -- Appendix A List of Interview Participants -- Appendix B Commissions of Inquiry and Legislative Reforms -- Appendix C Law Reform Commissions Statutory Functions -- Appendix D Samoa Law Reform Commission: Law Reform Process
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xix, 196 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783319655246
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Note
SpringerLink
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (OCoLC)1012346819
  • (OCoLC)on1012346819
Label
Law reform in plural societies, Teleiai Lalotoa Mulitalo Ropinisone Silipa Seumanutafa
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction -- 1.1. Divergent Currents -- 1.2. Geographical Context -- 1.3. Legal Pluralism and Law Reform -- 1.4. Overview -- References -- 2. Law Reform and Legal Pluralism Developments -- 2.1. Law Reform -- 2.1.1. Development of Law Reform Institutions and Agents -- 2.1.2. More Recent Developments -- 2.1.3. Legal Transplantation -- 2.1.4. Attempts to Recognise Customary Laws in State Laws -- 2.1.4.1. Codification of Customary Laws -- 2.1.4.2. Restatement of Customary Laws -- 2.1.4.3. Incorporation of Customary Laws by Reference -- 2.2. Law Reform Commissions (LRCS) and Legal Professions of the Pacific Islands -- 2.2.1. Proposal for a Regional Law Reform Commission -- 2.2.2. The Legal Profession -- 2.3. Legal Pluralism -- 2.3.1. Old Legal Pluralism, Colonial and Postcolonial Pluralism -- 2.3.2. New and Postmodern Pluralism -- 2.3.3. Other Categories of Legal Pluralism -- 2.4. Legal Pluralism in the Pacific Islands -- 2.4.1. Legal Pluralism in the Pacific Islands -- 2.4.2. Regional and Local Jurisprudence -- 2.4.3.A New Approach To Examining The Customary Law and State Law Divide -- 2.5. Overview -- References -- 3.A Research Methodology for the Pacific -- 3.1. Indigenous and Pacific Research Methodologies -- 3.1.1. Postcolonial Research Methodologies -- 3.1.2. Pacific Specific Methodologies -- 3.1.3. 'Talanoa' Research Methodology -- 3.2. Utilising Pacific Research Methodologies to Resolve Indigenous and Pacific Issues -- 3.2.1.'Talanoa' and Ethical Interview Principles -- 3.2.2. Analysing 'Talanoa' Interviews -- 3.2.3. Pacific Islands Legislative Drafters Survey -- 3.3. Primary Material and Documentary Data -- 3.3.1. Court Judgments and Hansard Reports -- 3.3.2.Commission of Inquiry Reports -- 3.3.3. National Reports -- 3.3.4. Local Newspaper Research: The Samoa Observer -- 3.4. Overview -- References -- 4. The Value of Law Reform: Social and Cultural -- 4.1. The Ideological Principles Behind Law Making: Customary Laws and State Laws -- 4.1.1. Social Views on Law Reform -- 4.1.2. Limited Understanding of State Laws -- 4.1.3. Lack of Formal Education -- 4.1.4. Relevance to Village Life -- 4.1.5. Cultural Factors -- 4.1.6. Language Barriers -- 4.1.7. Support from Secondary Data: Local Newspaper Research -- 4.1.8. Challenges to Address -- 4.2. Demand for Customs and Respect for the Constitution -- 4.2.1. Customary Laws as the Basis of the Legal System -- 4.2.2. Laws in the Samoan Context -- 4.2.3. Respect for the Constitution -- 4.2.4. Challenges to Address -- 4.3. Should Customs be Codified in Samoa's Laws? -- 4.3.1. Opposition to Codification -- 4.3.1.1. Conflicting Values -- 4.3.1.2. Flexibility -- 4.3.1.3. Ascertainment and Uniformity -- 4.3.1.4. Serving the Interests of Non-Locals Only -- 4.3.1.5. Absence of Customary Structures to Support Customs in Legislation -- 4.3.1.6. Difficulties for Legislative Drafters -- 4.3.1.7. Secondary Data: Pacific Legislative Drafters Survey -- 4.3.2. Benefits of Codification -- 4.3.2.1. Certainty and Constitutional Compliance -- 4.4. Emerging Conceptual Challenges -- 4.4.1. Understanding the Dichotomy -- 4.4.2. Need to Promote Understanding of State Laws -- 4.4.3. Customs to be Recognised in State Laws -- 4.4.4. Emerging Acceptance of Modern Laws -- 4.4.5. Interdependency -- References -- 5. State Focused Law Reform: Constitutional Offices, Institutions and Agents -- 5.1. The Courts -- 5.1.1. Jurisdiction on Customs -- 5.1.2. Judicial Training -- 5.1.3. Role of the Judiciary in Law Reform -- 5.1.4. Expatriate Judges -- 5.1.4.1. General Pacific Experiences -- 5.1.4.2. Interpretive Function of the Court -- 5.1.4.3. Village Agreement Unenforceable Under Contract Law -- 5.1.4.4. Obiter Unsupported by Local Realities -- 5.1.5. Overview: The Courts -- 5.2. The Parliament -- 5.2.1. Lack of Systems in Place to Support Assembly of Matai -- 5.2.1.1. Language in Parliamentary Proceedings -- 5.2.1.2. Law Making Procedures: Assembly Process and Private Members Bills -- 5.2.2. Unsuccessful Legal Transplants -- 5.2.3. Acts of Parliament with Custom References 1962 -- 2015 (Samoa) -- 5.2.3.1. Acts 1962 (Independence) to 1989 -- 5.2.3.2. Acts from 1990 to 2000 -- 5.2.3.3. Acts After 2000 -- 5.2.3.4. Overview -- 5.2.4. Analysis: Acts of Parliament and Acts with Customs References (2008 -- 2016) -- 5.2.5. Overview: The Parliament -- 5.3. The Executive -- 5.3.1. Executive Law Making Process -- 5.3.1.1. Cabinet Handbook -- 5.3.1.2. Legislative Drafting Handbook -- 5.3.2. Overview: The Executive -- 5.4. The Samoa Law Reform Commission (SLRC) -- 5.4.1. Establishment and Personnel -- 5.4.1.1. What Model of Law Reform Institution? -- 5.4.1.2. The Initial Years -- 5.4.1.3. Western Educated Personnel -- 5.4.1.4. The SLRC Advisory Board -- 5.4.2. Law Reform Process -- 5.4.3. Public Consultation -- 5.4.3.1. Costly Cultural Protocols -- 5.4.3.2. Law Reform Consultation -- 5.4.4. Overview: The SLRC -- 5.5. Other Law Reform Agents -- 5.5.1.Commissions of Inquiry (COI) -- 5.5.1.1. COIs for Customary Reforms -- 5.5.1.2. COI Investigations and Reforms to Date -- 5.5.1.3. COI Strengths -- 5.5.1.4. COI Challenges -- 5.5.1.5. Law Reform Driven by Both Matais (Customary) and Lawyers (Modem) -- 5.5.2. The Samoa Law Society (SLS) -- 5.5.2.1. Law Reform Functions -- 5.5.2.2. Challenges -- 5.5.3. Office of the Ombudsman -- 5.5.3.1. Law Reform Functions -- 5.5.3.2. Challenges -- 5.5.4. Non-Government Organisations (NGOs) -- 5.5.4.1. Law Reform Influence -- 5.5.4.2. Challenges -- 5.6. Emerging Conceptual Challenges -- 5.6.1. Law Reform Framework Not Embedded in Customs -- 5.6.1.1. Laws Authorising Law Making -- 5.6.1.2. Procedures Guiding Law Making -- 5.6.2. Limited Professional Training Opportunities -- 5.6.3. Involving the Village Structures in the Law Reform Process -- 5.6.4. Funding Constraints -- References
  • 5.4.3.2. Law Reform Consultation -- 5.4.4. Overview: The SLRC -- 5.5. Other Law Reform Agents -- 5.5.1.Commissions of Inquiry (COI) -- 5.5.1.1. COIs for Customary Reforms -- 5.5.1.2. COI Investigations and Reforms to Date -- 5.5.1.3. COI Strengths -- 5.5.1.4. COI Challenges -- 5.5.1.5. Law Reform Driven by Both Matais (Customary) and Lawyers (Modem) -- 5.5.2. The Samoa Law Society (SLS) -- 5.5.2.1. Law Reform Functions -- 5.5.2.2. Challenges -- 5.5.3. Office of the Ombudsman -- 5.5.3.1. Law Reform Functions -- 5.5.3.2. Challenges -- 5.5.4. Non-Government Organisations (NGOs) -- 5.5.4.1. Law Reform Influence -- 5.5.4.2. Challenges -- 5.6. Emerging Conceptual Challenges -- 5.6.1. Law Reform Framework Not Embedded in Customs -- 5.6.1.1. Laws Authorising Law Making -- 5.6.1.2. Procedures Guiding Law Making -- 5.6.2. Limited Professional Training Opportunities -- 5.6.3. Involving the Village Structures in the Law Reform Process -- 5.6.4. Funding Constraints -- References -- 6. Towards Responsive Law Reform -- 6.1. Public Awareness of State Laws -- 6.1.1. Develop Community Awareness -- 6.1.2. Facilitate Public Access to Acts and Court Decisions -- 6.2. Professional Training: Judiciary, Parliament, Legal Profession -- 6.2.1. The Judiciary -- 6.2.1.1. Judicial Training -- 6.2.1.2. Judicial Guidance Clause -- 6.2.1.3. Code of Judicial Conduct -- 6.2.1.4. Court Benchbooks -- 6.2.1.5. New Developments in the Courts of Samoa -- 6.2.2. Parliament -- 6.2.2.1. Professional Training -- 6.2.2.2. Customary Duties to Village Communities -- 6.2.2.3. Private Members Bill (PMB) -- 6.2.2.4. Recent Developments for Parliament -- 6.2.3. Legal Profession -- 6.2.3.1. Professional Training on the Rule of Law and Samoan Customs -- 6.2.3.2. Training on Samoan Language and Cultural Protocols -- 6.2.3.3. Engaging in Academic Conferences and Quality Research -- 6.3. State Responsibilities in Law Reform -- 6.3.1. Constitutional and Legislative Review, Drafting Handbooks -- 6.3.1.1. Reference Guide to Customary Practices -- 6.3.1.2. Village Fono Act (1990) Review -- 6.3.1.3. Cabinet and Drafting Handbooks -- 6.3.2. Promote Formal Education -- 6.3.3. National Plans -- 6.3.3.1. Samoa's National Plan 2012 -- 2016 -- 6.3.3.2. Law and Justice Sector Plan -- 6.4. Village Responsibilities in Law Reform -- 6.4.1. Change of Village Mayor Criteria -- 6.4.2. Develop Constitutionally Compliant Village Rules -- 6.5. Managing Funding Constraints -- 6.5.1. Involving Customary Structures in Law Reform Consultation -- 6.5.2. Prioritising and Justifying Costs for Customary Reforms -- 6.6. Local Jurisprudence: Customary Law as the Basis of Common Law -- 6.7. Legislative Drafters and Draft Laws -- 6.7.1. Pacific Specific Drafting and Law Reform Training -- 6.7.2. Drafting in the Samoan Language, Legislative References, Context -- 6.7.3. Review of Draft Laws for Customary Compliance -- 6.8. Summary of Responses to Legal Pluralism -- References -- 7.A Suitable Law Reform Framework for Pluralist Countries -- 7.1. Introduction -- 7.2.A Suitable Law Reform Process for Samoa -- 7.2.1. Before the Terms of Reference (TOR) -- 7.2.1.1. Step 1 -- 7.2.2. After a TOR is Received by the SLRC -- 7.2.2.1. Step 2: Research and Consultation -- 7.2.2.1.1. Doctrinal Research -- 7.2.2.1.2. Socio-Legal Research -- 7.2.2.2. Step 3: Issues Paper -- 7.2.2.3. Step 4: Research and Consultation -- 7.2.2.4. Step 5: Final Report with Recommendations -- 7.2.2.5. Step 6: Report Tabled in Parliament -- 7.2.3. The Draft Bill Process -- 7.2.3.1. Legislative Drafting -- 7.2.3.2. Vetting for Customary Compliance -- 7.2.3.3. Passage Through Parliament -- 7.2.4. Law Reform Process of Law Reform Agents -- 7.2.4.1.Commissions of Inquiry, Ombudsman, NGOs -- 7.3. Legislative Reforms and Guides -- 7.3.1. Local Jurisprudence -- 7.3.2. Judicial Clause and Guides -- 7.3.2.1. Constitutional Amendment -- 7.3.2.2. Code of Judicial Conduct -- 7.3.2.3. Court Benchbooks -- 7.3.3. Reference Guide to Customary Practices -- 7.3.4. Parliament Guides and Procedures -- 7.3.4.1. Guide for Members of Parliament -- 7.3.4.2. Standing Orders of Parliament -- 7.3.4.3. State Handbooks -- 7.3.4.3.1. Cabinet Handbook -- 7.3.4.3.2. Legislative Drafting Handbook of Samoa -- 7.3.5. Statutory Obligation to Consider Customs -- 7.4. Conclusions -- 7.4.1. Systematic Studies on Law Reform -- 7.4.2. The Challenges of Legal Pluralism for Law Reform in Samoa -- 7.4.3. Taking Advantage of Pluralism -- 7.4.4. Emerging Trends -- 7.4.4.1.A Winning Model? -- 7.4.4.2. Incorporation by Reference -- 7.4.4.3. State Initiatives that Accommodate Pluralism -- 7.5. Future Research -- 7.5.1. Constitutional Review -- 7.5.2. Local Jurisprudence -- 7.5.3. Pacific Island Specific Research -- 7.5.4. Samoa's Constitutional Compliant Village Rules -- 7.5.5. Follow up Research on Legal Pluralism and Law Reform in Samoa -- 7.5.6. Pacific Research Methodologies -- 7.5.7. Professional Training that Addresses Customs -- References -- Appendices -- Appendix A List of Interview Participants -- Appendix B Commissions of Inquiry and Legislative Reforms -- Appendix C Law Reform Commissions Statutory Functions -- Appendix D Samoa Law Reform Commission: Law Reform Process
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xix, 196 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783319655246
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Note
SpringerLink
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (OCoLC)1012346819
  • (OCoLC)on1012346819

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  • African Studies LibraryBorrow it
    771 Commonwealth Avenue, 6th Floor, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.350723 -71.108227
  • Alumni Medical LibraryBorrow it
    72 East Concord Street, Boston, MA, 02118, US
    42.336388 -71.072393
  • Astronomy LibraryBorrow it
    725 Commonwealth Avenue, 6th Floor, Boston, MA, 02445, US
    42.350259 -71.105717
  • Fineman and Pappas Law LibrariesBorrow it
    765 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.350979 -71.107023
  • Frederick S. Pardee Management LibraryBorrow it
    595 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.349626 -71.099547
  • Howard Gotlieb Archival Research CenterBorrow it
    771 Commonwealth Avenue, 5th Floor, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.350723 -71.108227
  • Mugar Memorial LibraryBorrow it
    771 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.350723 -71.108227
  • Music LibraryBorrow it
    771 Commonwealth Avenue, 2nd Floor, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.350723 -71.108227
  • Pikering Educational Resources LibraryBorrow it
    2 Silber Way, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.349804 -71.101425
  • School of Theology LibraryBorrow it
    745 Commonwealth Avenue, 2nd Floor, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.350494 -71.107235
  • Science & Engineering LibraryBorrow it
    38 Cummington Mall, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.348472 -71.102257
  • Stone Science LibraryBorrow it
    675 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA, 02445, US
    42.350103 -71.103784
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