The Resource Navigating the social world : what infants, children, and other species can teach us, edited by Mahzarin R. Banaji, Susan A. Gelman

Navigating the social world : what infants, children, and other species can teach us, edited by Mahzarin R. Banaji, Susan A. Gelman

Label
Navigating the social world : what infants, children, and other species can teach us
Title
Navigating the social world
Title remainder
what infants, children, and other species can teach us
Statement of responsibility
edited by Mahzarin R. Banaji, Susan A. Gelman
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
DLC
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
BF323.S63
LC item number
N385 2013
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
NLM call number
  • 2014 G-729
  • BF 323.S63
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Banaji, Mahzarin R
  • Gelman, Susan A
Series statement
Oxford series in social cognition and social neuroscience
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Social perception
  • Social perception in children
  • Social psychology
  • Social Perception
  • Cognition
  • Interpersonal Relations
  • Psychology, Social
  • Social Behavior
  • Social perception
  • Social perception in children
  • Social psychology
  • Soziale Wahrnehmung
  • Zwischenmenschliche Beziehung
  • Kind
  • Jugend
  • Entwicklungspsychologie
  • Kognitive Entwicklung
  • Lerntheorie
Label
Navigating the social world : what infants, children, and other species can teach us, edited by Mahzarin R. Banaji, Susan A. Gelman
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Core social cognition
  • 3.11.
  • Culture-gene coevolutionary theory and children's selective social learning
  • Maciej Chudek, Patricia Brosseau-Liard, Susan Birch, and Joseph Henrich
  • 3.12.
  • How causal learning helps us to understand other people, and how other people help us to learn about causes: probabilistic models and the development of social cognition
  • Alison Gopnik, Elizabeth Seiver, and Daphna Buchsbaum
  • 3.13.
  • How children learn from and about people: the fundamental link between social cognition and statistical evidence
  • Tamar Kushnir
  • 3.14.
  • Elizabeth S. Spelke, Emily P. Bernier, and Amy E. Skerry
  • Children learn from and about variability between people
  • David Liu and Kimberly E. Vanderbilt
  • Section IV. Trust and skepticism
  • 4.1.
  • The gaze of others
  • Philippe Rochat
  • 4.2.
  • Empathy deficits in autism and psychopaths: mirror opposites? Simon Baron-Cohen
  • 4.3.
  • Status seeking: the importance of roles in early social cognition
  • 1.4.
  • Charles W. Kalish
  • 4.4.
  • Reputation is everything
  • Alex W. Shaw, Vivian Li, and Kristina R. Olson
  • 4.5.
  • Understanding expertise: the contribution of social and nonsocial cognitive processes to social judgments
  • Judith H. Danovitch
  • 4.6.
  • Respectful deference: conformity revisited
  • Paul L. Harris and Kathleen H. Corriveau
  • Core cognition of relational models
  • 4.7.
  • Children's understanding of unreliability: evidence for a negativity bias
  • Melissa A. Koenig and Sabine Doebel
  • 4.8.
  • Biased to believe
  • Vikram K. Jaswal
  • 4.9.
  • Food as a unique domain in social cognition
  • Julie Lumeng
  • Section V. Us and them
  • Lotte Thomsen and Susan Carey
  • 5.1.
  • What is group psychology?: adaptations for mapping shared intentional stances
  • David Pietraszewski
  • 5.2.
  • The conceptual structure of social categories: the social allegiance hypothesis
  • Marjorie Rhodes
  • 5.3.
  • Essentialism: the development of a simple, but potentially dangerous, idea
  • Gil Diesendruck
  • 5.4.
  • 1.5.
  • Generic statements, causal attributions, and children's naive theories
  • Andrei Cimpian
  • 5.5.
  • From categories to exemplars (and back again)
  • Yarrow Dunham and Juliane Degner
  • 5.6.
  • Bridging the gap between preference and evaluation during the first few years of life
  • Andrew Scott Baron
  • 5.7.
  • On the developmental origins of differential responding to social category information
  • Infant cartographers: mapping the social terrain
  • Paul C. Quinn [and 5 others]
  • 5.8.
  • Building a better bridge
  • Sandra Waxman
  • 5.9.
  • Is gender special?
  • Kristin Shutts
  • 5.10.
  • Does your infant say the words "girl" and "boy"?: how gender labels matter in early gender development
  • Kristina M. Zosuls, Diane N. Ruble, Catherine Tamis-Lemonda, and Carol Lynn Martin
  • Karen Wynn
  • 5.11.
  • Bringing the cognitive and the social together: how gender detectives and gender enforcers shape children's gender development
  • Cindy Faith Miller, Carol Lynn Martin, Richard A. Fabes, and Laura D. Hanish
  • 5.12.
  • The development of language as a social category
  • Katherine D. Kinzler
  • 5.13.
  • The study of lay theories: a piece of the puzzle for understanding prejudice
  • Sheri R. Levy, Luisa Ramírez, Lisa Rosenthal, and Dina M. Karafantis
  • 5.14.
  • 1.6.
  • Social acumen: its role in constructing group identity and attitudes
  • Drew Nesdale
  • 5.15.
  • Understanding and reducing social stereotyping and prejudice among children
  • Rebecca S. Bigler
  • 5.16.
  • What are they thinking?: the mystery of young children's thoughts on race
  • Frances E. Aboud
  • 5.17.
  • How do children learn to actively control their explicit prejudice?
  • The evolution of concepts about agents
  • Adam Rutland
  • Section VI. Good and evil
  • 6.1.
  • What primates can tell us about the surprising nature of human choice
  • Laurie R. Santos and Louisa C. Egan Brad
  • 6.2.
  • Horrible children: the limits of natural morality
  • Paul Bloom
  • 6.3.
  • Young children's moral and social-conventional understanding
  • Section I. Framing the issues
  • Robert M. Seyfarth and Dorothy L. Cheney
  • Judith G. Smetana
  • 6.4.
  • The origin of children's appreciation of ownership rights
  • Karen R. Neary and Ori Friedman
  • 6.5.
  • Becoming a moral relativist: children's moral conceptions of honesty and dishonesty in different sociocultural contexts
  • Kang Lee and Angela Evans
  • 6.6.
  • The origins of the prosocial ape: insights from comparative studies of social preferences
  • Joan B. Silk
  • 1.7.
  • 6.7.
  • Cooperation, behavioral diversity, and inequity responses
  • Sarah F. Brosnan and Lydia M. Hopper
  • 6.8.
  • Morality, intentionality, and exclusion: how children navigate the social world
  • Kelly Lynn Mulvey, Aline Hitti, and Melanie Killen
  • 6.9.
  • Converging developments in prosocial behavior and self-other understanding in the second year of life: the second social-cognitive revolution
  • Celia A. Brownell, Sara R. Nichols, and Margarita Svetlova
  • 6.10.
  • The evolution of human sociocognitive development
  • Disposition attribution in infancy: the foundations of understanding helping and hindering interactions
  • Valerie Kuhlmeier
  • 6.11.
  • What do children and chimpanzees reveal about human altruism?
  • Felix Warneken
  • Victoria Wobber and Brian Hare
  • 1.8.
  • Teleological understanding of actions
  • Gergely Csibra and György Gergely
  • 1.9.
  • How universals and individual differences can inform each other: the case of social expectations in infancy
  • Susan C. Johnson, Carol S. Dweck, and Kristen A. Dunfield
  • 1.1.
  • 1.10.
  • The contribution of temperament to the study of social cognition: learning whether the glass is half empty or half full
  • Nathan A. Fox and Sarah M. Helfinstein
  • 1.11.
  • Emotion and learning: new approaches to the old nature-nurture debate
  • Seth D. Pollak
  • 1.12.
  • Early childhood is where many adult automatic processes are born
  • John A. Bargh
  • 1.13.
  • Social-cognitive development: a renaissance
  • Social evaluation
  • Gail D. Heyman
  • Section II. Mentalizing
  • 2.1.
  • Universal social cognition: childhood theory of mind
  • Henry M. Wellman
  • 2.2.
  • Infant foundations of intentional understanding
  • Amanda Woodward
  • 2.3.
  • Carol S. Dweck
  • Why don't apes understand false beliefs?
  • Michael Tomasello and Henrike Moll
  • 2.4.
  • False-belief understanding and why it matters: the social-acting hypothesis
  • Renée Baillargeon [and 6 others]
  • 2.5.
  • Language and reasoning about beliefs
  • Jill De Villiers
  • 2.6.
  • The myth of mentalizing and the primacy of folk sociology
  • 1.2.
  • Lawrence A. Hirschfeld
  • 2.7.
  • The new puzzle of theory of mind development
  • Rebecca Saxe
  • 2.8.
  • How real is the imaginary?: the capacity for high-risk children to gain comfort from imaginary relationships
  • Marjorie Taylor and Naomi R. Aguiar
  • 2.9 Social engagement does not lead to social cognition: evidence from Williams syndrome
  • Helen Tager-Flusberg and Daniela Plesa Skwerer
  • Section III. Imitation, modeling, and learning from and about others
  • The paradox of the emerging social brain
  • 3.1.
  • Natural pedagogy
  • György Gergely and Gergely Csibra
  • 3.2.
  • A comparison of neonatal imitation abilities in human and macaque infants
  • Annika Paukner, Pier F. Ferrari, and Stephen J. Suomi
  • 3.3.
  • Origins of social cognition: bidirectional self-other mapping and the "like-me" hypothesis
  • Andrew N. Meltzoff
  • 3.4.
  • Mark H. Johnson
  • Overimitation and the development of causal understanding
  • Derek E. Lyons and Frank C. Keil
  • 3.5.
  • Social cognition: making us smart, or sometimes making us dumb?: overimitation, conformity, nonconformity, and the transmission of culture in ape and child
  • Andrew Whiten
  • 3.6.
  • Early social deprivation and the neurobiology of interpreting facial expressions
  • Nim Tottenham
  • 3.7.
  • The emergence of perceptual preferences for social signals of emotion
  • 1.3.
  • Jukka M. Leppänen and Charles A. Nelson III
  • 3.8.
  • Some thoughts on the development and neural bases of face processing
  • Charles A. Nelson III
  • 3.9.
  • Redescribing action
  • Dare Baldwin
  • 3.10.
  • Preschoolers are selective word learners
  • Mark A. Sabbagh and Annette M.E. Henderson
Dimensions
26 cm.
Extent
xxiii, 424 pages
Isbn
9780199890712
Lccn
2012040012
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
  • (OCoLC)813220915
  • (OCoLC)ocn813220915
Label
Navigating the social world : what infants, children, and other species can teach us, edited by Mahzarin R. Banaji, Susan A. Gelman
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Core social cognition
  • 3.11.
  • Culture-gene coevolutionary theory and children's selective social learning
  • Maciej Chudek, Patricia Brosseau-Liard, Susan Birch, and Joseph Henrich
  • 3.12.
  • How causal learning helps us to understand other people, and how other people help us to learn about causes: probabilistic models and the development of social cognition
  • Alison Gopnik, Elizabeth Seiver, and Daphna Buchsbaum
  • 3.13.
  • How children learn from and about people: the fundamental link between social cognition and statistical evidence
  • Tamar Kushnir
  • 3.14.
  • Elizabeth S. Spelke, Emily P. Bernier, and Amy E. Skerry
  • Children learn from and about variability between people
  • David Liu and Kimberly E. Vanderbilt
  • Section IV. Trust and skepticism
  • 4.1.
  • The gaze of others
  • Philippe Rochat
  • 4.2.
  • Empathy deficits in autism and psychopaths: mirror opposites? Simon Baron-Cohen
  • 4.3.
  • Status seeking: the importance of roles in early social cognition
  • 1.4.
  • Charles W. Kalish
  • 4.4.
  • Reputation is everything
  • Alex W. Shaw, Vivian Li, and Kristina R. Olson
  • 4.5.
  • Understanding expertise: the contribution of social and nonsocial cognitive processes to social judgments
  • Judith H. Danovitch
  • 4.6.
  • Respectful deference: conformity revisited
  • Paul L. Harris and Kathleen H. Corriveau
  • Core cognition of relational models
  • 4.7.
  • Children's understanding of unreliability: evidence for a negativity bias
  • Melissa A. Koenig and Sabine Doebel
  • 4.8.
  • Biased to believe
  • Vikram K. Jaswal
  • 4.9.
  • Food as a unique domain in social cognition
  • Julie Lumeng
  • Section V. Us and them
  • Lotte Thomsen and Susan Carey
  • 5.1.
  • What is group psychology?: adaptations for mapping shared intentional stances
  • David Pietraszewski
  • 5.2.
  • The conceptual structure of social categories: the social allegiance hypothesis
  • Marjorie Rhodes
  • 5.3.
  • Essentialism: the development of a simple, but potentially dangerous, idea
  • Gil Diesendruck
  • 5.4.
  • 1.5.
  • Generic statements, causal attributions, and children's naive theories
  • Andrei Cimpian
  • 5.5.
  • From categories to exemplars (and back again)
  • Yarrow Dunham and Juliane Degner
  • 5.6.
  • Bridging the gap between preference and evaluation during the first few years of life
  • Andrew Scott Baron
  • 5.7.
  • On the developmental origins of differential responding to social category information
  • Infant cartographers: mapping the social terrain
  • Paul C. Quinn [and 5 others]
  • 5.8.
  • Building a better bridge
  • Sandra Waxman
  • 5.9.
  • Is gender special?
  • Kristin Shutts
  • 5.10.
  • Does your infant say the words "girl" and "boy"?: how gender labels matter in early gender development
  • Kristina M. Zosuls, Diane N. Ruble, Catherine Tamis-Lemonda, and Carol Lynn Martin
  • Karen Wynn
  • 5.11.
  • Bringing the cognitive and the social together: how gender detectives and gender enforcers shape children's gender development
  • Cindy Faith Miller, Carol Lynn Martin, Richard A. Fabes, and Laura D. Hanish
  • 5.12.
  • The development of language as a social category
  • Katherine D. Kinzler
  • 5.13.
  • The study of lay theories: a piece of the puzzle for understanding prejudice
  • Sheri R. Levy, Luisa Ramírez, Lisa Rosenthal, and Dina M. Karafantis
  • 5.14.
  • 1.6.
  • Social acumen: its role in constructing group identity and attitudes
  • Drew Nesdale
  • 5.15.
  • Understanding and reducing social stereotyping and prejudice among children
  • Rebecca S. Bigler
  • 5.16.
  • What are they thinking?: the mystery of young children's thoughts on race
  • Frances E. Aboud
  • 5.17.
  • How do children learn to actively control their explicit prejudice?
  • The evolution of concepts about agents
  • Adam Rutland
  • Section VI. Good and evil
  • 6.1.
  • What primates can tell us about the surprising nature of human choice
  • Laurie R. Santos and Louisa C. Egan Brad
  • 6.2.
  • Horrible children: the limits of natural morality
  • Paul Bloom
  • 6.3.
  • Young children's moral and social-conventional understanding
  • Section I. Framing the issues
  • Robert M. Seyfarth and Dorothy L. Cheney
  • Judith G. Smetana
  • 6.4.
  • The origin of children's appreciation of ownership rights
  • Karen R. Neary and Ori Friedman
  • 6.5.
  • Becoming a moral relativist: children's moral conceptions of honesty and dishonesty in different sociocultural contexts
  • Kang Lee and Angela Evans
  • 6.6.
  • The origins of the prosocial ape: insights from comparative studies of social preferences
  • Joan B. Silk
  • 1.7.
  • 6.7.
  • Cooperation, behavioral diversity, and inequity responses
  • Sarah F. Brosnan and Lydia M. Hopper
  • 6.8.
  • Morality, intentionality, and exclusion: how children navigate the social world
  • Kelly Lynn Mulvey, Aline Hitti, and Melanie Killen
  • 6.9.
  • Converging developments in prosocial behavior and self-other understanding in the second year of life: the second social-cognitive revolution
  • Celia A. Brownell, Sara R. Nichols, and Margarita Svetlova
  • 6.10.
  • The evolution of human sociocognitive development
  • Disposition attribution in infancy: the foundations of understanding helping and hindering interactions
  • Valerie Kuhlmeier
  • 6.11.
  • What do children and chimpanzees reveal about human altruism?
  • Felix Warneken
  • Victoria Wobber and Brian Hare
  • 1.8.
  • Teleological understanding of actions
  • Gergely Csibra and György Gergely
  • 1.9.
  • How universals and individual differences can inform each other: the case of social expectations in infancy
  • Susan C. Johnson, Carol S. Dweck, and Kristen A. Dunfield
  • 1.1.
  • 1.10.
  • The contribution of temperament to the study of social cognition: learning whether the glass is half empty or half full
  • Nathan A. Fox and Sarah M. Helfinstein
  • 1.11.
  • Emotion and learning: new approaches to the old nature-nurture debate
  • Seth D. Pollak
  • 1.12.
  • Early childhood is where many adult automatic processes are born
  • John A. Bargh
  • 1.13.
  • Social-cognitive development: a renaissance
  • Social evaluation
  • Gail D. Heyman
  • Section II. Mentalizing
  • 2.1.
  • Universal social cognition: childhood theory of mind
  • Henry M. Wellman
  • 2.2.
  • Infant foundations of intentional understanding
  • Amanda Woodward
  • 2.3.
  • Carol S. Dweck
  • Why don't apes understand false beliefs?
  • Michael Tomasello and Henrike Moll
  • 2.4.
  • False-belief understanding and why it matters: the social-acting hypothesis
  • Renée Baillargeon [and 6 others]
  • 2.5.
  • Language and reasoning about beliefs
  • Jill De Villiers
  • 2.6.
  • The myth of mentalizing and the primacy of folk sociology
  • 1.2.
  • Lawrence A. Hirschfeld
  • 2.7.
  • The new puzzle of theory of mind development
  • Rebecca Saxe
  • 2.8.
  • How real is the imaginary?: the capacity for high-risk children to gain comfort from imaginary relationships
  • Marjorie Taylor and Naomi R. Aguiar
  • 2.9 Social engagement does not lead to social cognition: evidence from Williams syndrome
  • Helen Tager-Flusberg and Daniela Plesa Skwerer
  • Section III. Imitation, modeling, and learning from and about others
  • The paradox of the emerging social brain
  • 3.1.
  • Natural pedagogy
  • György Gergely and Gergely Csibra
  • 3.2.
  • A comparison of neonatal imitation abilities in human and macaque infants
  • Annika Paukner, Pier F. Ferrari, and Stephen J. Suomi
  • 3.3.
  • Origins of social cognition: bidirectional self-other mapping and the "like-me" hypothesis
  • Andrew N. Meltzoff
  • 3.4.
  • Mark H. Johnson
  • Overimitation and the development of causal understanding
  • Derek E. Lyons and Frank C. Keil
  • 3.5.
  • Social cognition: making us smart, or sometimes making us dumb?: overimitation, conformity, nonconformity, and the transmission of culture in ape and child
  • Andrew Whiten
  • 3.6.
  • Early social deprivation and the neurobiology of interpreting facial expressions
  • Nim Tottenham
  • 3.7.
  • The emergence of perceptual preferences for social signals of emotion
  • 1.3.
  • Jukka M. Leppänen and Charles A. Nelson III
  • 3.8.
  • Some thoughts on the development and neural bases of face processing
  • Charles A. Nelson III
  • 3.9.
  • Redescribing action
  • Dare Baldwin
  • 3.10.
  • Preschoolers are selective word learners
  • Mark A. Sabbagh and Annette M.E. Henderson
Dimensions
26 cm.
Extent
xxiii, 424 pages
Isbn
9780199890712
Lccn
2012040012
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
  • (OCoLC)813220915
  • (OCoLC)ocn813220915

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