The Resource Nuclear Nonproliferation and Safety; Uncertainties About the Implementation of U.S.-Russian Plutonium Disposition Efforts

Nuclear Nonproliferation and Safety; Uncertainties About the Implementation of U.S.-Russian Plutonium Disposition Efforts

Label
Nuclear Nonproliferation and Safety; Uncertainties About the Implementation of U.S.-Russian Plutonium Disposition Efforts
Title
Nuclear Nonproliferation and Safety; Uncertainties About the Implementation of U.S.-Russian Plutonium Disposition Efforts
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
From World War II to the end of the Cold War, the United States and the former Soviet Union produced large quantities of plutonium to build nuclear weapons. With the lessening of tensions between the United States and Russia, efforts began to reduce the inventory of both countries' excess plutonium. In early 1994, Presidents Clinton and Yeltsin endorsed the goal of nuclear arms reduction and directed experts to begin studying options for the long-term disposition of plutonium and other nuclear materials. In 1995, the United States declared that 38.2 metric tons of weapons-grade plutonium was no longer needed for national security and was, therefore, excess. DOE also designated 14.3 metric tons of non-weapons-grade plutonium as excess. Because a portion of the plutonium declared excess is scrap or residue with low contents of plutonium, it is unsuitable for fabrication into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and is better suited for immobilization instead. According to DOE, plutonium scheduled for disposition will come primarily from (1) metal that may have been in a retired nuclear weapon, (2) oxides, (3) unirradiated fuel, and (4) irradiated fuel. Securing plutonium derived from these sources will require conversion into forms that meet the 'spent fuel standard.' This standard, which was introduced by the National Academy of Sciences and endorsed by DOE, requires that plutonium be made roughly as unattractive and difficult to retrieve and use in nuclear weapons as the plutonium that exists in spent fuel from commercial nuclear power reactors. DOE plans to convert about 50 metric tons of excess plutonium into forms suitable for eventual disposal. Of the total, DOE plans to immobilize about 17 tons and could process the remainder as MOX fuel, although a final decision on whether to burn or immobilize this plutonium has not been made
Cataloging source
DTICE
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
GENERAL ACCOUNTING OFFICE WASHINGTON DC RESOURCES COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DIV
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • United states
  • Russia
  • Disposal
  • Plutonium
  • Nuclear proliferation
  • Nuclear weapons
  • Ussr
  • National security
  • Decision making
  • Fuels
  • Oxides
  • Cold war
  • Safety
  • Fissionable materials
  • Nuclear power plants
  • Radioactive materials
  • Restraint
  • Arms control
  • Inventory
  • Mixing
  • Irradiation
  • Nuclear reactors
  • Second world war
  • Government and Political Science
  • Radiation and Nuclear Chemistry
  • Fission Reactor Materials
Label
Nuclear Nonproliferation and Safety; Uncertainties About the Implementation of U.S.-Russian Plutonium Disposition Efforts
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Extent
39 pages
Form of item
online
Governing access note
APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
Hein Online
System control number
  • (OCoLC)227863534
  • (OCoLC)ocn227863534
Label
Nuclear Nonproliferation and Safety; Uncertainties About the Implementation of U.S.-Russian Plutonium Disposition Efforts
Publication
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Extent
39 pages
Form of item
online
Governing access note
APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
Hein Online
System control number
  • (OCoLC)227863534
  • (OCoLC)ocn227863534

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