The Resource Southern rights : political prisoners and the myth of Confederate constitutionalism, Mark E. Neely, Jr

Southern rights : political prisoners and the myth of Confederate constitutionalism, Mark E. Neely, Jr

Label
Southern rights : political prisoners and the myth of Confederate constitutionalism
Title
Southern rights
Title remainder
political prisoners and the myth of Confederate constitutionalism
Statement of responsibility
Mark E. Neely, Jr
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
On the day Fort Sumter surrendered to Confederate authorities, General Braxton Bragg reacted to a newspaper report that might have revealed the position of gun emplacements by arresting the correspondent, a Southern loyalist. Thus the Confederate army's first detention of a citizen occurred before President Lincoln had even called out troops to suppress the rebellion. During the civil war that followed, not a day would pass when Confederate military prisons did not contain political prisoners. Based on the discovery of records of over four thousand of these prisoners, Mark E. Neely, Jr.'s book undermines the common understanding that Jefferson Davis and the Confederates were scrupulous in their respect for constitutional rights while Lincoln and the Unionists regularly violated the rights of dissenters. Neely reveals for the first time the extent of repression of Unionists and other civilians in the Confederacy and uncovers and marshals convincing evidence that Southerners were as ready as their Northern counterparts to give up civil liberties in response to the real or imagined threats of wartime. From the onset of hostilities, the exploits of drunken recruits prompted communities from Selma to Lynchburg to beg the Richmond government to impose martial law. Southern citizens resigned themselves to a passport system for domestic travel similar to the system of passes imposed on enslaved and free blacks before the war. These restrictive measures made commerce difficult and constrained religious activity. As one Virginian complained, "This struggle was begun in defence of Constitutional Liberty which we could not get in the United States." The Davis administration countered that the passport system was essential to prevent desertion from the army, and most Southerners accepted the passports as a necessary inconvenience, ignoring the irony that the necessities of national mobilization had changed their government from a states'-rights confederacy to a powerful, centralized authority. After the war the records of men imprisoned by this authority were lost through a combination of happenstance and deliberate obfuscation. Their discovery and interpretation by Neely Jr. explodes one of the remaining myths of Lost Cause historiography, revealing Jefferson Davis as a calculated manipulator of the symbols of liberty
Member of
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Neely, Mark E
Government publication
government publication of a state province territory dependency etc
Index
index present
LC call number
E487
LC item number
.N44 1999
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Confederate States of America
  • United States
  • USA
  • Political prisoners
  • Civil rights
  • Constitutional law
  • Martial law
  • Civil rights
  • Constitutional law
  • Martial law
  • Political prisoners
  • Politics and government
  • Amerikaanse burgeroorlog
  • Politieke gevangenen
  • Oorlogsrecht
  • États confédérés d'Amérique
  • Prisonniers politiques
  • Droits civils et politiques
  • Droit constitutionnel
  • Droit militaire
  • Politischer Gefangener
  • Standrecht
  • Bürgerrecht
  • Sezessionskrieg <1861-1865>
Label
Southern rights : political prisoners and the myth of Confederate constitutionalism, Mark E. Neely, Jr
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 175-204) and indexes
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • The Politics of Pastoralism in East Tennessee
  • Persistent Unionism in Western Virginia and North Carolina
  • A Provincial Society at War : Civil Liberties in "the Other Confederacy"
  • Jefferson Davis and History
  • Jefferson Davis and the Writ of Habeas Corpus
  • Conclusion : the Paradox of Confederate Historiography
  • Liberty and Order
  • The Rogue Tyrant and the Premodern State
  • Alcohol and Martial Law : the Problem of Order in the Confederacy
  • The Confederate Bench and Bar
  • Liberty and the Bar of the Confederacy
  • "Unaffected by ... the Condition of Our Country" : the Peculiar Jurisprudence of Richmond M. Pearson
  • Ghosts of the Dead Habeas Corpus : the Habeas Corpus Commissioners
  • Dissent
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
vii, 212 pages
Isbn
9780813918945
Lccn
99025230
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
System control number
  • (OCoLC)41076301
  • (OCoLC)ocm41076301
Label
Southern rights : political prisoners and the myth of Confederate constitutionalism, Mark E. Neely, Jr
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 175-204) and indexes
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • The Politics of Pastoralism in East Tennessee
  • Persistent Unionism in Western Virginia and North Carolina
  • A Provincial Society at War : Civil Liberties in "the Other Confederacy"
  • Jefferson Davis and History
  • Jefferson Davis and the Writ of Habeas Corpus
  • Conclusion : the Paradox of Confederate Historiography
  • Liberty and Order
  • The Rogue Tyrant and the Premodern State
  • Alcohol and Martial Law : the Problem of Order in the Confederacy
  • The Confederate Bench and Bar
  • Liberty and the Bar of the Confederacy
  • "Unaffected by ... the Condition of Our Country" : the Peculiar Jurisprudence of Richmond M. Pearson
  • Ghosts of the Dead Habeas Corpus : the Habeas Corpus Commissioners
  • Dissent
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
vii, 212 pages
Isbn
9780813918945
Lccn
99025230
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
System control number
  • (OCoLC)41076301
  • (OCoLC)ocm41076301

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