The Resource The English Bible ; : History of the translation of the Holy Scriptures into the English tongue. With specimens of the old English versions, by Mrs. H.C. Conant ..

The English Bible ; : History of the translation of the Holy Scriptures into the English tongue. With specimens of the old English versions, by Mrs. H.C. Conant ..

Label
The English Bible ; : History of the translation of the Holy Scriptures into the English tongue. With specimens of the old English versions
Title
The English Bible ;
Title remainder
History of the translation of the Holy Scriptures into the English tongue. With specimens of the old English versions
Statement of responsibility
by Mrs. H.C. Conant ..
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1809-1865
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Conant, H. C.
Illustrations
portraits
Index
no index present
LC call number
BS455
LC item number
.C7 1856
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
Label
The English Bible ; : History of the translation of the Holy Scriptures into the English tongue. With specimens of the old English versions, by Mrs. H.C. Conant ..
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Note
"The principal works consulted in the preparation of this volume": p. vi-viii
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Part First: England without the Bible -- Chapter I. The Bible the people's charter -- Relation of Wycliffe to his age -- Chapter II. The Papal army in England -- The secular clergy -- The monks -- The Mendicant friars -- Chapter III. Counter-influences: their inefficiency -- Edward III -- The Barons -- Magna Charta -- The universities -- House of Commons -- Chapter IV. The Bible-apostle -- Opposes the Mendicant friars on the ground of Scripture -- Summoned to Parliament -- Argues against the papal claim to tribute -- Advocates the exclusion of churchmen from civil office -- Becomes theological professor at Oxford -- His teachings anticipate those of the Reformation -- Chapter V. The pope and bishops in the field -- Wycliffe sent as ambassador to the papal court -- Cited before the convocation as a heretic -- Scene at St. Paul's -- Five papal bulls for his apprehension -- His advice to Parliament -- Trial at Lambeth -- Vindicates the civil and the ecclesiastical rights of laity -- Rescued by Londoners -- Chapter VI. The New Testament ministry revived -- Wycliffe's view of the clerical office -- Labors of his "poore priests" -- Alarm of the Romish clergy -- Fraudulent legislation -- True apostolic succession -- Chapter VII. Wycliffe attacks the citadel of papal influence -- The Catholic theory of communion -- Wycliffe's protestant stand-point -- Silenced at Oxford -- Retires to Lutterworth -- Chapter VIII. Wycliffe's writings for the people -- Originates religious tracts -- Influence of his popular writings -- Chapter IX. The first English Bible -- Wycliffe's prvious labors in Bible translation -- Right of the laity to the Scriptures -- His version made from the vulgate -- Wycliffe's death -- Chapter X. Influence of Wycliffe's version -- England's only Bible for a hundred and thirty years -- Its wide diffusion -- Rapid growth of the spirit of religious freedom -- Checked by Henry IV -- The Lollards -- Statutes against Wycliffe's Bible -- Its character and claims -- Chapter XI. Wycliffe's influence abroad -- Effect of his writing sin Bohemia -- Huss, and Jerome of Prague -- Council of Constance -- Sentence against Wycliffe's writings -- His body condemned to be disinterred and burned -- Execution of the decree -- Increased spread of his views in Bohemia -- Bohemian Bibles -- Influence of Bohemia on the Reformation -- Wycliffe's relation to modern Christianity -- Part Second: Age of Bible translation in England -- Chapter I. Religious aspects of England -- Wycliffe's Bible and the Lollards -- Revival of learning in the schools -- Spread of the Reformation in England -- Chapter II. Tyndale's New Testament -- Tyndale's early history -- His youthful attempts at Bible translation -- Seeks the patronage of Tunstal, Bishop of London -- Finds that the Bible cannot be translated in England -- Humphry Monmouth his friend and patron -- Translates the New Testament in Hamburg -- Goes to Cologne to print it -- Aided by English merchants -- The Bible hater -- Councillor Rincke -- Tyndale obliged to flee from Cologne to Worms -- Change of plans -- The New Testament in England -- The secret search -- Fryshe's "supplication of beggars" -- Thomas Garrett -- Scenes at Oxford and Cambridge -- Dr Barne's trial -- Burning of New Testaments -- The king enlisted -- Luther's blunder -- Royal prohibition of Tyndale's translation -- Efforts for its suppression on the continent -- The bishops on the alert -- Archbishop Warham buys up New Testaments -- Wolsey as Vicar-General -- Trial of Arthur and Bilney -- Constant multiplication and spread of the New Testament -- Chapter III. Tyndale's Reformatory writings -- "Parable of the wicked mammon" -- "The obedience of the Christian man" -- Light thrown by these writings on the state of the times, and the extortions of the clergy -- Tyndale's view of church offices and sacraments -- Defends the right of the laity to the Bible -- Theological training in the universities -- The Bible the only safe guide -- Chapter IV. Cardinal Wolsey's measures to silence Tyndale -- Application to the Princess-Regent of Brabant for his arrest -- Imprisonment of his friend Harman -- The British merchant takes reprisals -- Councillor Rincke overreached -- Tyndale safe in Marburg
  • Chapter V. The new antagonist -- Character of Sir Thomas More -- His early connection with Erasmus and the cause of Church reform -- Spirit and sentiments of his utopia -- Chapter VI. The reformer transformed -- Alarmed for the ancient faith -- Distrusts the reformation as revolutionary -- More's inward religious history -- Characteristics of his controversial writings for the people -- His fundamental principle: the infallibility of the Church -- The Church the authoritative interpreter of Scripture -- Chapter VII. Shall the people have the Bible? -- More concedes the principle of vernacular translation -- Advises postponement to a more favorable period -- Grounds his opposition to Tyndale's translation -- Contrast with Tyndale's views -- Persecuting spirit of anti-Bible principle -- Tyndale's challenge unanswered -- Chapter VIII. Sir Thomas More as lord Chancellor -- The civil power takes the lead in persecution -- Royal manifesto against heretics -- Grand movement against heretical books -- The Scripture in the vernacular declared injurious -- Royal proclamation against Tyndale's writings -- Tunstal's Bible burning -- How he obtained the Bibles -- More avows himself a persecutor -- Defends the oath ex-officio -- His opinion of juries -- Advocates the violation of safe-conducts granted to heretics -- More's reverse -- Cannot violate his conscience -- His bitterness towards heretics unchanged -- Chapter IX. The youthful martyr -- Character of faith -- Friendship of Frith and Tyndale, their connection in the translation of the Bible -- Frith's visit to England -- Congregations of the faithful; Sir Thomas More's account of them -- Grounds of More's hatred of Frith -- Adventure at reading -- Frith entrapped and imprisoned in the Tower -- His letter from prison to the "faithful" -- Tyndale's letters to Frith -- Controversy of the letter with Rastell while in the Tower -- Controversy with the Lord Chancellor -- Spirit and demeanor of Frith in prison -- His trial appointed -- Efforts to save him -- Trial, conviction and execution -- Chapter X. Anne Boleyn: the royal patroness -- Peculiar circumstances of Henry's marriage -- Wolsey's intrigues -- Henry seeks to obtain a divorce -- Early life of Anne Boleyn -- Anne at the English court -- Wolsey and the bishops enter into the king's plan -- Pope Clement's policy -- Henry appeals to the universities -- Prepares for a rupture with Rome; message to the House of Commons; humiliation of the clergy -- Marriage with Anne Boleyn -- Contrast between More and Tyndale in regard to the divorce -- Tyndale's practice of prelates -- Queen Anne's connection with the Reformation -- Richard Harmon -- Tyndale's gift -- Anne's influence in favor of the Bible -- Hatred of the popish party -- Conspiracy against Anne -- Chapter XI. The martyrdom of Tyndale -- Efforts to entrap Tyndale -- The English envoy, Stephen Vaughan -- Interviews with Tyndale -- Sir Thomas More, the investigator of these measures -- Vaughan's plea for religious liberty -- The new envoy; his efforts to seize Tyndale -- The reformer's life at Antwerp -- The bishop's plot -- Tyndale's apprehension -- Thomas Pointz -- The decree of Augsburg -- Tyndale's condemnation and death -- Chapter XII. Triumph of the principle -- Truth not dependent on its champions -- Review of the progress of the Bible up to Tyndale's death -- Thomas Crumwell; grounds of his interest in the people's Bible -- Matthew's Bible -- Its singular introduction into England -- Authorized by the king for use in Churches -- Allowed to all classes -- Henry's zeal; stringent requisitions in favor of the Bible; copies placed in Churches for the use of the people -- Its welcome by the commonality -- Prelates obliged to countenance it -- Romish dogmas in bad repute -- Henry's alarm at the influence of the Bible -- Restrictions in its use -- The six articles -- Character of Edward's reign -- The principle triumphant -- The Protestant principle as applied to Bible translation -- Permanence of Tyndale's New Testament -- Chapter XIII. Coverdale's Bible -- Reasons for the undertaking -- Utility of various translations -- Character of the version -- Hindrances -- Coverdale the overseer of the Great Bible (Tyndale's) -- His nonconformity and sufferings -- Chapter XIV. Taverner's Bible
  • Chapter XV. Cranmer's Bible -- Early life of Cranmer -- Veneration for the Scriptures -- Influence as primate in favor of vernacular translation -- Revision of Tyndale's version -- Preface -- Counterplot of the Bishops -- The Anglican Church -- Cranmer's intolerance -- Treatment of Gardiner; of Hooper; of sectaries and heretics -- Essential vice of a State Church -- Vital distinction between the Anglican and Roman Church -- Progress of the Bible under Edward VI -- Chapter XVI. The reign of terror -- Character of Queen Mary -- Her early misfortunes -- First steps on her ascension -- Obscurantism inaugurated -- Protestant exiles -- Romanism reestablished -- Unparalleled cruelties -- The congregations -- Evidences of the progressives influence of the Bible -- Chapter XVII. The Genevan Bible -- English exiles -- Spirit of the age in respect to Bible translation -- Proposal of a new version -- Zeal of the lay exiles -- John Bodleigh -- Peculiar advantages at Geneva -- Calvin's preface to the New Testament -- Scholarship of the Genevan Bible -- Division into verses -- Becomes the family Bible of England -- Causes of its success -- Its agency in the development of Puritanism -- Its influence not wholly beneficial -- Chapter XVIII. The bishop's Bible -- Preliminary view -- Liberal spirit of the returned exiles -- Counter policy of Elizabeth -- Action of her first Parliament -- The court of high commission -- The star chamber -- The reformed clergy succumb to the Queen; establishment of uniformity -- Nonconformity the nurse of civil freedom -- List of dangerous innovations: grounds of Puritan dissent -- Measures of Archbishop Parker -- trial of Sampson and Humphrey; citation of the London ministers; oppressive injunction -- Coverdale and Fox -- Leading traits of the conflicting parties -- Chapter XIX. The Bishop's Bible: continued -- Archbishop Parker the projector and overseer of the work -- His motives -- Continued influence of the Genevan version -- Anti-Episcopal feature of the Church Bible -- Parker's preface -- Scholarship of the Bishop's Bible -- Its sectarian character -- Subsequent restoration of readings from the vulgate -- Chapter XX. The Rhemish or Douay Bible -- Translators' views of vernacular Bibles -- Policy of the Roman Church -- Cardinal Ximenes -- Reasons for this translation -- Its characteristics -- Influences of the Douay Bible -- Chapter XXI. The common version -- State of parties at the death of Elizabeth -- Reactionary influence of persecution -- Prospect of a Puritan sovereign -- James' non-committal policy -- Summons the Hampton court conference -- Triumph of the Prelatical party -- Royal epistle -- New translation proposed by the Puritans -- Motive's of James' concurrence -- State of public opinion -- Hugh Broughton's efforts for a revision of the Church Bible -- The Puritanic influence of the Genevan version -- The king's plan -- Chapter XXII. The common version: continued -- The king's liberal arrangements for securing and rewarding competent revisers -- Rules of translation prescribed by the king -- Principles involved in these rules -- Their influence on the character of the version -- Its scholarship -- Contemporaneous criticism -- Obstacles of its reception, within and without the Church -- Measures for a new translation -- The just claims of the common version -- Chapter XXIII. Conclusion -- Retrospective view -- Leading characteristics of English Bible translation -- New and brilliant era of sacred learning -- Progress in every branch of biblical knowledge -- Restoration of the original text for use of the learned -- Present state of scholarship two centuries in advance of the English Bible -- Appendices: Specimens of the early English version; the Immaculate conception; the Soldier's Bible
Dimensions
19 cm
Extent
xv, [1] pages 1 1., [13]-466 pages
Lccn
32016683
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
2 portrait (including frontispiece)
System control number
(OCoLC)2486306
Label
The English Bible ; : History of the translation of the Holy Scriptures into the English tongue. With specimens of the old English versions, by Mrs. H.C. Conant ..
Link
Publication
Note
"The principal works consulted in the preparation of this volume": p. vi-viii
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Part First: England without the Bible -- Chapter I. The Bible the people's charter -- Relation of Wycliffe to his age -- Chapter II. The Papal army in England -- The secular clergy -- The monks -- The Mendicant friars -- Chapter III. Counter-influences: their inefficiency -- Edward III -- The Barons -- Magna Charta -- The universities -- House of Commons -- Chapter IV. The Bible-apostle -- Opposes the Mendicant friars on the ground of Scripture -- Summoned to Parliament -- Argues against the papal claim to tribute -- Advocates the exclusion of churchmen from civil office -- Becomes theological professor at Oxford -- His teachings anticipate those of the Reformation -- Chapter V. The pope and bishops in the field -- Wycliffe sent as ambassador to the papal court -- Cited before the convocation as a heretic -- Scene at St. Paul's -- Five papal bulls for his apprehension -- His advice to Parliament -- Trial at Lambeth -- Vindicates the civil and the ecclesiastical rights of laity -- Rescued by Londoners -- Chapter VI. The New Testament ministry revived -- Wycliffe's view of the clerical office -- Labors of his "poore priests" -- Alarm of the Romish clergy -- Fraudulent legislation -- True apostolic succession -- Chapter VII. Wycliffe attacks the citadel of papal influence -- The Catholic theory of communion -- Wycliffe's protestant stand-point -- Silenced at Oxford -- Retires to Lutterworth -- Chapter VIII. Wycliffe's writings for the people -- Originates religious tracts -- Influence of his popular writings -- Chapter IX. The first English Bible -- Wycliffe's prvious labors in Bible translation -- Right of the laity to the Scriptures -- His version made from the vulgate -- Wycliffe's death -- Chapter X. Influence of Wycliffe's version -- England's only Bible for a hundred and thirty years -- Its wide diffusion -- Rapid growth of the spirit of religious freedom -- Checked by Henry IV -- The Lollards -- Statutes against Wycliffe's Bible -- Its character and claims -- Chapter XI. Wycliffe's influence abroad -- Effect of his writing sin Bohemia -- Huss, and Jerome of Prague -- Council of Constance -- Sentence against Wycliffe's writings -- His body condemned to be disinterred and burned -- Execution of the decree -- Increased spread of his views in Bohemia -- Bohemian Bibles -- Influence of Bohemia on the Reformation -- Wycliffe's relation to modern Christianity -- Part Second: Age of Bible translation in England -- Chapter I. Religious aspects of England -- Wycliffe's Bible and the Lollards -- Revival of learning in the schools -- Spread of the Reformation in England -- Chapter II. Tyndale's New Testament -- Tyndale's early history -- His youthful attempts at Bible translation -- Seeks the patronage of Tunstal, Bishop of London -- Finds that the Bible cannot be translated in England -- Humphry Monmouth his friend and patron -- Translates the New Testament in Hamburg -- Goes to Cologne to print it -- Aided by English merchants -- The Bible hater -- Councillor Rincke -- Tyndale obliged to flee from Cologne to Worms -- Change of plans -- The New Testament in England -- The secret search -- Fryshe's "supplication of beggars" -- Thomas Garrett -- Scenes at Oxford and Cambridge -- Dr Barne's trial -- Burning of New Testaments -- The king enlisted -- Luther's blunder -- Royal prohibition of Tyndale's translation -- Efforts for its suppression on the continent -- The bishops on the alert -- Archbishop Warham buys up New Testaments -- Wolsey as Vicar-General -- Trial of Arthur and Bilney -- Constant multiplication and spread of the New Testament -- Chapter III. Tyndale's Reformatory writings -- "Parable of the wicked mammon" -- "The obedience of the Christian man" -- Light thrown by these writings on the state of the times, and the extortions of the clergy -- Tyndale's view of church offices and sacraments -- Defends the right of the laity to the Bible -- Theological training in the universities -- The Bible the only safe guide -- Chapter IV. Cardinal Wolsey's measures to silence Tyndale -- Application to the Princess-Regent of Brabant for his arrest -- Imprisonment of his friend Harman -- The British merchant takes reprisals -- Councillor Rincke overreached -- Tyndale safe in Marburg
  • Chapter V. The new antagonist -- Character of Sir Thomas More -- His early connection with Erasmus and the cause of Church reform -- Spirit and sentiments of his utopia -- Chapter VI. The reformer transformed -- Alarmed for the ancient faith -- Distrusts the reformation as revolutionary -- More's inward religious history -- Characteristics of his controversial writings for the people -- His fundamental principle: the infallibility of the Church -- The Church the authoritative interpreter of Scripture -- Chapter VII. Shall the people have the Bible? -- More concedes the principle of vernacular translation -- Advises postponement to a more favorable period -- Grounds his opposition to Tyndale's translation -- Contrast with Tyndale's views -- Persecuting spirit of anti-Bible principle -- Tyndale's challenge unanswered -- Chapter VIII. Sir Thomas More as lord Chancellor -- The civil power takes the lead in persecution -- Royal manifesto against heretics -- Grand movement against heretical books -- The Scripture in the vernacular declared injurious -- Royal proclamation against Tyndale's writings -- Tunstal's Bible burning -- How he obtained the Bibles -- More avows himself a persecutor -- Defends the oath ex-officio -- His opinion of juries -- Advocates the violation of safe-conducts granted to heretics -- More's reverse -- Cannot violate his conscience -- His bitterness towards heretics unchanged -- Chapter IX. The youthful martyr -- Character of faith -- Friendship of Frith and Tyndale, their connection in the translation of the Bible -- Frith's visit to England -- Congregations of the faithful; Sir Thomas More's account of them -- Grounds of More's hatred of Frith -- Adventure at reading -- Frith entrapped and imprisoned in the Tower -- His letter from prison to the "faithful" -- Tyndale's letters to Frith -- Controversy of the letter with Rastell while in the Tower -- Controversy with the Lord Chancellor -- Spirit and demeanor of Frith in prison -- His trial appointed -- Efforts to save him -- Trial, conviction and execution -- Chapter X. Anne Boleyn: the royal patroness -- Peculiar circumstances of Henry's marriage -- Wolsey's intrigues -- Henry seeks to obtain a divorce -- Early life of Anne Boleyn -- Anne at the English court -- Wolsey and the bishops enter into the king's plan -- Pope Clement's policy -- Henry appeals to the universities -- Prepares for a rupture with Rome; message to the House of Commons; humiliation of the clergy -- Marriage with Anne Boleyn -- Contrast between More and Tyndale in regard to the divorce -- Tyndale's practice of prelates -- Queen Anne's connection with the Reformation -- Richard Harmon -- Tyndale's gift -- Anne's influence in favor of the Bible -- Hatred of the popish party -- Conspiracy against Anne -- Chapter XI. The martyrdom of Tyndale -- Efforts to entrap Tyndale -- The English envoy, Stephen Vaughan -- Interviews with Tyndale -- Sir Thomas More, the investigator of these measures -- Vaughan's plea for religious liberty -- The new envoy; his efforts to seize Tyndale -- The reformer's life at Antwerp -- The bishop's plot -- Tyndale's apprehension -- Thomas Pointz -- The decree of Augsburg -- Tyndale's condemnation and death -- Chapter XII. Triumph of the principle -- Truth not dependent on its champions -- Review of the progress of the Bible up to Tyndale's death -- Thomas Crumwell; grounds of his interest in the people's Bible -- Matthew's Bible -- Its singular introduction into England -- Authorized by the king for use in Churches -- Allowed to all classes -- Henry's zeal; stringent requisitions in favor of the Bible; copies placed in Churches for the use of the people -- Its welcome by the commonality -- Prelates obliged to countenance it -- Romish dogmas in bad repute -- Henry's alarm at the influence of the Bible -- Restrictions in its use -- The six articles -- Character of Edward's reign -- The principle triumphant -- The Protestant principle as applied to Bible translation -- Permanence of Tyndale's New Testament -- Chapter XIII. Coverdale's Bible -- Reasons for the undertaking -- Utility of various translations -- Character of the version -- Hindrances -- Coverdale the overseer of the Great Bible (Tyndale's) -- His nonconformity and sufferings -- Chapter XIV. Taverner's Bible
  • Chapter XV. Cranmer's Bible -- Early life of Cranmer -- Veneration for the Scriptures -- Influence as primate in favor of vernacular translation -- Revision of Tyndale's version -- Preface -- Counterplot of the Bishops -- The Anglican Church -- Cranmer's intolerance -- Treatment of Gardiner; of Hooper; of sectaries and heretics -- Essential vice of a State Church -- Vital distinction between the Anglican and Roman Church -- Progress of the Bible under Edward VI -- Chapter XVI. The reign of terror -- Character of Queen Mary -- Her early misfortunes -- First steps on her ascension -- Obscurantism inaugurated -- Protestant exiles -- Romanism reestablished -- Unparalleled cruelties -- The congregations -- Evidences of the progressives influence of the Bible -- Chapter XVII. The Genevan Bible -- English exiles -- Spirit of the age in respect to Bible translation -- Proposal of a new version -- Zeal of the lay exiles -- John Bodleigh -- Peculiar advantages at Geneva -- Calvin's preface to the New Testament -- Scholarship of the Genevan Bible -- Division into verses -- Becomes the family Bible of England -- Causes of its success -- Its agency in the development of Puritanism -- Its influence not wholly beneficial -- Chapter XVIII. The bishop's Bible -- Preliminary view -- Liberal spirit of the returned exiles -- Counter policy of Elizabeth -- Action of her first Parliament -- The court of high commission -- The star chamber -- The reformed clergy succumb to the Queen; establishment of uniformity -- Nonconformity the nurse of civil freedom -- List of dangerous innovations: grounds of Puritan dissent -- Measures of Archbishop Parker -- trial of Sampson and Humphrey; citation of the London ministers; oppressive injunction -- Coverdale and Fox -- Leading traits of the conflicting parties -- Chapter XIX. The Bishop's Bible: continued -- Archbishop Parker the projector and overseer of the work -- His motives -- Continued influence of the Genevan version -- Anti-Episcopal feature of the Church Bible -- Parker's preface -- Scholarship of the Bishop's Bible -- Its sectarian character -- Subsequent restoration of readings from the vulgate -- Chapter XX. The Rhemish or Douay Bible -- Translators' views of vernacular Bibles -- Policy of the Roman Church -- Cardinal Ximenes -- Reasons for this translation -- Its characteristics -- Influences of the Douay Bible -- Chapter XXI. The common version -- State of parties at the death of Elizabeth -- Reactionary influence of persecution -- Prospect of a Puritan sovereign -- James' non-committal policy -- Summons the Hampton court conference -- Triumph of the Prelatical party -- Royal epistle -- New translation proposed by the Puritans -- Motive's of James' concurrence -- State of public opinion -- Hugh Broughton's efforts for a revision of the Church Bible -- The Puritanic influence of the Genevan version -- The king's plan -- Chapter XXII. The common version: continued -- The king's liberal arrangements for securing and rewarding competent revisers -- Rules of translation prescribed by the king -- Principles involved in these rules -- Their influence on the character of the version -- Its scholarship -- Contemporaneous criticism -- Obstacles of its reception, within and without the Church -- Measures for a new translation -- The just claims of the common version -- Chapter XXIII. Conclusion -- Retrospective view -- Leading characteristics of English Bible translation -- New and brilliant era of sacred learning -- Progress in every branch of biblical knowledge -- Restoration of the original text for use of the learned -- Present state of scholarship two centuries in advance of the English Bible -- Appendices: Specimens of the early English version; the Immaculate conception; the Soldier's Bible
Dimensions
19 cm
Extent
xv, [1] pages 1 1., [13]-466 pages
Lccn
32016683
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
2 portrait (including frontispiece)
System control number
(OCoLC)2486306

Library Locations

  • African Studies LibraryBorrow it
    771 Commonwealth Avenue, 6th Floor, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.350723 -71.108227
  • Alumni Medical LibraryBorrow it
    72 East Concord Street, Boston, MA, 02118, US
    42.336388 -71.072393
  • Astronomy LibraryBorrow it
    725 Commonwealth Avenue, 6th Floor, Boston, MA, 02445, US
    42.350259 -71.105717
  • Fineman and Pappas Law LibrariesBorrow it
    765 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.350979 -71.107023
  • Frederick S. Pardee Management LibraryBorrow it
    595 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.349626 -71.099547
  • Howard Gotlieb Archival Research CenterBorrow it
    771 Commonwealth Avenue, 5th Floor, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.350723 -71.108227
  • Mugar Memorial LibraryBorrow it
    771 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.350723 -71.108227
  • Music LibraryBorrow it
    771 Commonwealth Avenue, 2nd Floor, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.350723 -71.108227
  • Pikering Educational Resources LibraryBorrow it
    2 Silber Way, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.349804 -71.101425
  • School of Theology LibraryBorrow it
    745 Commonwealth Avenue, 2nd Floor, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.350494 -71.107235
  • Science & Engineering LibraryBorrow it
    38 Cummington Mall, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.348472 -71.102257
  • Stone Science LibraryBorrow it
    675 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA, 02445, US
    42.350103 -71.103784
Processing Feedback ...