The Resource The love books of Ovid : being the amores, ars amatoria, remedia amoris and medicamina faciei femineae, of Publius Ovidius Naso ; translated out of the Latin by J. Lewis May ; illustrated by Jean de Bosschère

The love books of Ovid : being the amores, ars amatoria, remedia amoris and medicamina faciei femineae, of Publius Ovidius Naso ; translated out of the Latin by J. Lewis May ; illustrated by Jean de Bosschère

Label
The love books of Ovid : being the amores, ars amatoria, remedia amoris and medicamina faciei femineae
Title
The love books of Ovid
Title remainder
being the amores, ars amatoria, remedia amoris and medicamina faciei femineae
Statement of responsibility
of Publius Ovidius Naso ; translated out of the Latin by J. Lewis May ; illustrated by Jean de Bosschère
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Action
committed to retain for EAST
Cataloging source
AKC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
43 B.C.-17 A.D. or 18 A.D
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Ovid
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
LC call number
PA6522.A3
LC item number
L6 1930
Literary form
non fiction
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1873-
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
May, J. Lewis
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Ovid
  • Ovid
  • Love poetry, Latin
  • Love poetry, Latin
Label
The love books of Ovid : being the amores, ars amatoria, remedia amoris and medicamina faciei femineae, of Publius Ovidius Naso ; translated out of the Latin by J. Lewis May ; illustrated by Jean de Bosschère
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Book I -- The loves -- Elegy I: The poet explains how it is he comes to sing of love instead of battles -- Elegy II: The triumph of love -- Elegy III: He commands himself to his mistress by the merits of his poetry, the purity of his morals, and by the voew of his unchangeable fidelity -- Elegy IV: Ovid, his mistress and her husband are all bidden to the same supper. He gives his mistress a code by which they can testify their love for each other, beneath her husband's very eyes -- Elegy V: His delight at having obtained Corinna's favours -- Elegy VI: He conjures the porter to open the door of his mistress's house -- Elegy VII: He curses himself for having maltreated his mistress -- Elegy VIII: He curses a certain a certain old woman of the town whom he overhears instructing his mistress in the arts of a courtesan -- Elegy IX: He compareth love with war -- Elegy X: He endeavours to dissuade his mistress from becoming a courtesan -- Elegy XI: He asks Nape to deliver a love-letter to her mistress -- Elegy XII: He calls down curses on the tablets which bring him word of his mistress's refusal -- Elegy XIII: He entreats the dawn to hasten not her coming -- Elegy XIV: To his mistress, who, contrary to his counsel, dyed her hair with noxious compositions, and has nearly become bald -- Elegy XV: The poets along are immortal -- Book II -- Elegy I: He tells wherefore, instead of the wars of the giants, which he had commenced, he is constrained to sing of love -- Elegy II: To the Eunuch Bagoas, begging him to give him access to the fair one committed to his charge -- Elegy III: He appeals once more to Bagoa, who had proved inflexible -- Elegy IV: He confesses his inclination for love and his admiration for all manner of women -- Elegy V: He upbraids his mistress whom he has detected acted falsely towards him -- Elegy VI: He laments the death of the parrot he had given to his mistress -- Elegy VII: He assures Corinna that he has never had any guilty commerce with Cypassis, her maid -- Elegy VIII: He asks Cypassis how in the world Corinna could have found them out -- Elegy IX: He beseeches Cupid not to discharge all his arrows at him alone -- Elegy X: He tells græcinus how, despite what he syas to the contrary, it is possible to be in love with two women at the same time -- Elegy XI: He seeks to dissuade Corinna from going to Baiæ -- Elegy XII: He rejoices at having at last won the favours of Corinna -- Elegy XIII: He beseeches Isis to come to the aid of Corinna in her confinement -- Elegy XIV: On Corinna's recovery he writes to her again concerning her attempt at abortion, and tells her how naughty she has been -- Elegy XV: To the ring which he is sending to his mistress -- Elegy XVII: He complains to Corinna that she is too conceited about her good looks -- Elegy XVIII: To Macer: to whom he excuses himself for giving himself up wholly to erotic verse -- Elegy XIX: To a man with whose wife he was in love -- Book III -- Elegy I: The tragic and the elegiac muse strive for the possession of Ovid -- Elegy II: The circus -- Elegy III: To his mistress, whom he has found to be forsworn -- Elegy IV: He urges a husband not to keep so strict a watch on his wife -- Elegy V: A dream -- Elegy VI: To a river which has overflowed its banks and hindered the poet, who has hastening to his mistress -- Elegy VII: The poet reproaches himself for having failed in his duty towards his mistress -- Elegy VIII: To his mistress, complaining that she has given preference to a wealthier rival -- Elegy IX: On the death of Tibullus -- Elegy X: He complains to Ceres that, during her festival, he is not suffered to share his mistress' couch -- Elegy XI: Weary at length of his mistress' infidelities, he swears that he will love her no longer -- Elegy XII: He laments that his poems have made his mistress too well known -- Elegy XIII: The festival of Juno at Falisci -- Elegy XIV: To his mistress -- Elegy XV: He bids farewell to his wanton muse, to court one more austere -- The art of love -- Love's cure -- The art of beauty
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
xxxiii, 216 pages
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations (some color)
System control number
(OCoLC)2509543
Label
The love books of Ovid : being the amores, ars amatoria, remedia amoris and medicamina faciei femineae, of Publius Ovidius Naso ; translated out of the Latin by J. Lewis May ; illustrated by Jean de Bosschère
Link
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Book I -- The loves -- Elegy I: The poet explains how it is he comes to sing of love instead of battles -- Elegy II: The triumph of love -- Elegy III: He commands himself to his mistress by the merits of his poetry, the purity of his morals, and by the voew of his unchangeable fidelity -- Elegy IV: Ovid, his mistress and her husband are all bidden to the same supper. He gives his mistress a code by which they can testify their love for each other, beneath her husband's very eyes -- Elegy V: His delight at having obtained Corinna's favours -- Elegy VI: He conjures the porter to open the door of his mistress's house -- Elegy VII: He curses himself for having maltreated his mistress -- Elegy VIII: He curses a certain a certain old woman of the town whom he overhears instructing his mistress in the arts of a courtesan -- Elegy IX: He compareth love with war -- Elegy X: He endeavours to dissuade his mistress from becoming a courtesan -- Elegy XI: He asks Nape to deliver a love-letter to her mistress -- Elegy XII: He calls down curses on the tablets which bring him word of his mistress's refusal -- Elegy XIII: He entreats the dawn to hasten not her coming -- Elegy XIV: To his mistress, who, contrary to his counsel, dyed her hair with noxious compositions, and has nearly become bald -- Elegy XV: The poets along are immortal -- Book II -- Elegy I: He tells wherefore, instead of the wars of the giants, which he had commenced, he is constrained to sing of love -- Elegy II: To the Eunuch Bagoas, begging him to give him access to the fair one committed to his charge -- Elegy III: He appeals once more to Bagoa, who had proved inflexible -- Elegy IV: He confesses his inclination for love and his admiration for all manner of women -- Elegy V: He upbraids his mistress whom he has detected acted falsely towards him -- Elegy VI: He laments the death of the parrot he had given to his mistress -- Elegy VII: He assures Corinna that he has never had any guilty commerce with Cypassis, her maid -- Elegy VIII: He asks Cypassis how in the world Corinna could have found them out -- Elegy IX: He beseeches Cupid not to discharge all his arrows at him alone -- Elegy X: He tells græcinus how, despite what he syas to the contrary, it is possible to be in love with two women at the same time -- Elegy XI: He seeks to dissuade Corinna from going to Baiæ -- Elegy XII: He rejoices at having at last won the favours of Corinna -- Elegy XIII: He beseeches Isis to come to the aid of Corinna in her confinement -- Elegy XIV: On Corinna's recovery he writes to her again concerning her attempt at abortion, and tells her how naughty she has been -- Elegy XV: To the ring which he is sending to his mistress -- Elegy XVII: He complains to Corinna that she is too conceited about her good looks -- Elegy XVIII: To Macer: to whom he excuses himself for giving himself up wholly to erotic verse -- Elegy XIX: To a man with whose wife he was in love -- Book III -- Elegy I: The tragic and the elegiac muse strive for the possession of Ovid -- Elegy II: The circus -- Elegy III: To his mistress, whom he has found to be forsworn -- Elegy IV: He urges a husband not to keep so strict a watch on his wife -- Elegy V: A dream -- Elegy VI: To a river which has overflowed its banks and hindered the poet, who has hastening to his mistress -- Elegy VII: The poet reproaches himself for having failed in his duty towards his mistress -- Elegy VIII: To his mistress, complaining that she has given preference to a wealthier rival -- Elegy IX: On the death of Tibullus -- Elegy X: He complains to Ceres that, during her festival, he is not suffered to share his mistress' couch -- Elegy XI: Weary at length of his mistress' infidelities, he swears that he will love her no longer -- Elegy XII: He laments that his poems have made his mistress too well known -- Elegy XIII: The festival of Juno at Falisci -- Elegy XIV: To his mistress -- Elegy XV: He bids farewell to his wanton muse, to court one more austere -- The art of love -- Love's cure -- The art of beauty
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
xxxiii, 216 pages
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations (some color)
System control number
(OCoLC)2509543

Library Locations

  • African Studies LibraryBorrow it
    771 Commonwealth Avenue, 6th Floor, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.350723 -71.108227
  • Alumni Medical LibraryBorrow it
    72 East Concord Street, Boston, MA, 02118, US
    42.336388 -71.072393
  • Astronomy LibraryBorrow it
    725 Commonwealth Avenue, 6th Floor, Boston, MA, 02445, US
    42.350259 -71.105717
  • Fineman and Pappas Law LibrariesBorrow it
    765 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.350979 -71.107023
  • Frederick S. Pardee Management LibraryBorrow it
    595 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.349626 -71.099547
  • Howard Gotlieb Archival Research CenterBorrow it
    771 Commonwealth Avenue, 5th Floor, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.350723 -71.108227
  • Mugar Memorial LibraryBorrow it
    771 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.350723 -71.108227
  • Music LibraryBorrow it
    771 Commonwealth Avenue, 2nd Floor, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.350723 -71.108227
  • Pikering Educational Resources LibraryBorrow it
    2 Silber Way, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.349804 -71.101425
  • School of Theology LibraryBorrow it
    745 Commonwealth Avenue, 2nd Floor, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.350494 -71.107235
  • Science & Engineering LibraryBorrow it
    38 Cummington Mall, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.348472 -71.102257
  • Stone Science LibraryBorrow it
    675 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA, 02445, US
    42.350103 -71.103784
Processing Feedback ...