The Resource The modern tradition; : backgrounds of modern literature,, edited by Richard Ellmann and Charles Feidelson, Jr

The modern tradition; : backgrounds of modern literature,, edited by Richard Ellmann and Charles Feidelson, Jr

Label
The modern tradition; : backgrounds of modern literature,
Title
The modern tradition;
Title remainder
backgrounds of modern literature,
Statement of responsibility
edited by Richard Ellmann and Charles Feidelson, Jr
Creator
Contributor
Editor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1918-1987
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Ellmann, Richard
Index
no index present
LC call number
PN49
LC item number
.E5
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
NLM call number
PN 49
NLM item number
E47m 1965
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Feidelson, Charles
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Literature
  • Aesthetics
  • History
  • History
  • Literature
  • Philosophy
  • Literature
  • Littérature
  • Esthétique
  • Histoire
  • Aesthetics
  • History
  • Literature
  • Letterkunde
  • Literatur
  • Literaturtheorie
  • Moderne
  • Literatur
  • Literaturtheorie
  • Moderne
Label
The modern tradition; : backgrounds of modern literature,, edited by Richard Ellmann and Charles Feidelson, Jr
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Bibliographical footnotes
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • André Malraux
  • W.B. Yeats
  • Art as ascetic religion
  • Gustave Flaubert
  • The mission of the artist
  • Rainer Maria Rilke
  • The artist as universal man
  • Paul Valéry
  • The art of life.
  • The intensity of the moment
  • Walter Pater
  • The interaction of imagination and nature.
  • Artificial sensation
  • Joris-Karl Huysmans
  • The reflexive image
  • André Gide
  • The completed image
  • W.B. Yeats
  • The aesthetic transformation of the earth
  • Rainer Maria Rilke
  • The artist and society.
  • An aesthetic mysticism
  • The imaginative faculty and the function of art
  • Gustave Flaubert
  • Art as evidence of order
  • E.M. Forster
  • The poet as revolutionary seer
  • Arthur Rimbaud
  • Art as aristocratic mystery
  • Stéphane Mallarmé
  • Poetry as a game of knowledge
  • W.H. Auden
  • Poetry as rite
  • Immanuel Kant
  • W.H. Auden
  • Art as establisher of value
  • Wallace Stevens
  • Realism: Objectivity.
  • A realism of love
  • George Eliot
  • False ideals exposed
  • Bernard Shaw
  • Heroic honesty
  • Gustave Flaubert
  • The coalescence of mind and nature
  • Dunghills as artistic material
  • Anton Chekhov
  • Historical determinism.
  • Society as historical organism
  • Honoré de Balzac
  • Art as historical product
  • Hippolyte Taine
  • Shortcomings of Taine's theory
  • Gustave Flaubert
  • Man as the creature of history
  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  • Leo Tolstoy
  • Naturalistic determinism.
  • Man as natural mechanism
  • Theodore Dreiser
  • Clinical realism
  • Edmond and Jules de Goncourt
  • The novel as social science
  • Emile Zola
  • A naturalistic manifesto
  • August Strindberg
  • The penetration of things
  • The fad of naturalism
  • Edmond and Jules de Goncourt
  • Melioristic realism.
  • Art as ethical communication
  • Leo Tolstoy
  • Prophetic realism
  • F.M. Dostoevsky
  • The counter-religions of humanity and art
  • George Sand and Gustave Flaubert
  • The counter-claims of content and form
  • Rainer Maria Rilke
  • H.G. Wells and Henry James
  • Socialist realism.
  • Social reality as class struggle
  • Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels
  • The economic sources of consciousness
  • Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels
  • The limitations of formalism
  • Leon Trotsky
  • Historical truth in fiction
  • Georg Lukács
  • Concrete art
  • A new realism.
  • Dehumanizing nature
  • Alain Robbe-Grillet
  • Nature: Struggle.
  • The struggle for existence and natural selection
  • Charles Darwin
  • The will in nature
  • Arthur Schopenhauer
  • Organicism.
  • Nature as organism
  • Hans Arp
  • A.N. Whitehead
  • Nature, man, and art
  • Rainer Maria Rilke
  • The life of the hawthorn
  • Marcel Proust
  • Natural joy
  • André Gide
  • The death of Pan
  • D.H. Lawrence
  • Mechanical force.
  • Symbolism. Imagination and nature: The revolt against nature.
  • Symbolic nature.
  • The new multiverse
  • Henry Adams
  • The joy of mechanical force
  • F.T. Marinetti
  • The physics of human character
  • D.H. Lawrence
  • Indeterminacy.
  • Pluralism, pragmatism, and instrumental truth
  • William James
  • Thought as a natural event
  • The eternal world of vision
  • John Dewey
  • Non-objective science and uncertainty
  • Werner Heisenberg
  • Cultural history: Idealism.
  • History as the self-realization of spirit
  • G.W.F Hegel
  • History as human self-knowledge
  • Benedetto Croce
  • Patterns of repetition.
  • The three ages
  • William Blake
  • Giambattista Vico
  • Eternal recurrence
  • Friedrich Nietzsche
  • The organic logic of history
  • Oswald Spengler
  • History and imagination.
  • History as symbolic reality
  • W.B. Yeats
  • The triumph of art over history
  • André Malraux
  • Natural apocalypse
  • Religion and history.
  • The historical meaning of Christianity
  • Nicolas Berdyaev
  • Primitive survivals.
  • The pre-human in the human
  • Charles Darwin
  • The savage in the human
  • Sir James G. Frazer
  • An archaic mystery
  • Henry Miller
  • William Wordsworth
  • The unconscious: Unreason and reason.
  • The demoniac
  • Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
  • Energy and reason
  • William Blake
  • Will and knowledge
  • Arthur Schopenhauer
  • Dionysos and Apollo
  • Friedrich Nietzsche
  • The Freudian unconscious.
  • The temple of nature
  • The structure of the unconscious
  • Sigmund Freud
  • The instincts
  • Sigmund Freud
  • The theory of dreams
  • Sigmund Freud
  • The Oedipus complex
  • Sigmund Freud
  • The origins of culture
  • Sigmund Freud
  • Charles Baudelaire
  • The significance of Freud
  • Thomas Mann
  • Liberation of the unconscious.
  • A non-Freudian unconscious
  • D.H. Lawrence
  • Dadaism
  • Tristan Tzara
  • Surrealism
  • André Breton
  • Myth: Myth in primitive thought.
  • Symbol as revelation
  • The king of the wood
  • Sir James G. Frazer
  • The social psychology of myth
  • Bronislaw Malinowski
  • The validity and form of mythical thought
  • Ernst Cassirer
  • The collective unconscious.
  • The collective unconscious and archetypes
  • C.G. Jung
  • The psychological function of archetypes
  • W.B. Yeats
  • C.G. Jung
  • The principal archetypes
  • C.G. Jung
  • Myth and literature.
  • Modern mythology
  • Friedrich Schlegel
  • Imaginative types
  • Victor Hugo
  • The folk and the myth
  • Richard Wagner
  • Eternal genesis
  • Visionary history
  • William Blake
  • Myth as memory
  • Nicolas Berdyaev
  • Psychoanalysis, the lived myth, and fiction
  • Thomas Mann
  • Myth and literary classicism
  • T.S. Eliot
  • Self-consciousness: Self-realization.
  • An experiment in self-revelation
  • The priority of art
  • Paul Klee
  • Jean-Jacques Rousseau
  • The value of inconsistency
  • André Gide
  • The living self
  • D.H. Lawrence
  • The self and reality
  • Rainer Maria Rilke
  • An Expressionist credo
  • Wassily Kandinsky
  • The field of consciousness.
  • Imagination and thought: The state of doubt.
  • Centers of consciousness
  • Henry James
  • The stream of consciousness
  • William James
  • Duration
  • Henri Bergson
  • The recapturing of time
  • Marcel Proust
  • The divided self.
  • The ironic consciousness
  • Escape from ideas
  • Friedrich Schlegel
  • The contrite consciousness
  • G.W.F. Hegel
  • Alienation
  • Karl Marx
  • Indirect communication
  • Søren Kierkegaard
  • The masks of truth
  • Friedrich Nietzsche
  • The anti-self
  • Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
  • W.B. Yeats
  • Freedom.
  • Sympathy and asceticism
  • Arthur Schopenhauer
  • Self-overcoming
  • Friedrich Nietzsche
  • The perverse self
  • F.M. Dostoevsky
  • Existence: The definition of existence.
  • The individual and the crowd
  • Negative capability
  • Søren Kierkegaard
  • Concrete existence and abstract system
  • Søren Kierkegaard
  • The free thinker and the consensus
  • Friedrich Nietzsche
  • Subjective will and objective truth
  • Friedrich Nietzsche
  • Moments of existence.
  • The fact of absurdity
  • Albert Camus
  • John Keats
  • Existence precedes essence
  • Jean-Paul Sartre
  • Choice
  • Søren Kierkegaard
  • Choice in a world without God
  • Jean-Paul Sartre
  • Dread reveals nothing
  • Martin Heidegger
  • Dread as education toward faith
  • Søren Kierkegaard
  • Art without conclusions
  • Authenticity
  • Jean-Paul Sartre
  • Value in existence.
  • Absurd freedom
  • Albert Camus
  • Commitment
  • Jean-Paul Sartre
  • Faith by virtue of the absurd
  • Søren Kierkegaard
  • The will to communicate
  • Gustave Flaubert
  • Karl Jaspers
  • The common condition of man
  • Jean-Paul Sartre
  • The primary words
  • Martin Buber
  • The encompassing
  • Karl Jaspers
  • Recollection of being
  • Martin Heidegger
  • Faith: Christianity and Christendom.
  • The role of thought in poetry.
  • The Lord's prayer modernized
  • William Blake
  • A hypocritical generation
  • Søren Kierkegaard
  • Christ and the Grand Inquisitor
  • F.M. Dostoevsky
  • Deified man.
  • God in man
  • William Blake
  • The death of God and the antichrist
  • Poetry, language, and thought
  • Friedrich Nietzsche
  • Poeticized religion.
  • The finer spirit of knowledge
  • Matthew Arnold
  • An allegory of human life
  • George Santayana
  • Paganized Christianity.
  • The resurrection of the body
  • D.H. Lawrence
  • Salvation on earth
  • Oscar Wilde
  • Paul Valéry
  • André Gide
  • Orthodoxy.
  • The errors of André Gide
  • Paul Claudel
  • Man becomes God
  • Charles Baudelaire
  • The errors of modern rationalism
  • Jacques Maritain
  • The modern confusion of categories
  • T.E. Hulme
  • Pseudo-statements
  • The one and only God
  • Karl Barth
  • The state of doubt.
  • The meaning of meaninglessness
  • Paul Tillich
  • I.A. Richards
  • Sensibility and thought in metaphysical poetry
  • T.S. Eliot
  • The state of affirmation.
  • The acceptance of untruth
  • Friedrich Nietzsche
  • The conquest of skepticism
  • W.B. Yeats
  • The unnatural will to art
  • The autonomy of art: The doctrine of purity.
  • The didactic heresy
  • Charles Baudelaire
  • The improvidence of art
  • Oscar Wilde
  • Literature as music-drama
  • Richard Wagner
  • Poetry as incantation
  • Stéphane Mallarmé
  • Pure painting
  • Rainer Maria Rilke
  • Guillaume Apollinaire
  • The non-picture
  • Marcel Duchamp
  • The purification of fiction.
  • The novel of consciousness
  • Virginia Woolf
  • Style as absolute
  • Gustave Flaubert
  • The pure novel
  • André Gide
  • Art as individual idea
  • The objective artifact.
  • The impersonality of art
  • Gustave Flaubert
  • Artistic objectivity
  • Rainer Maria Rilke
  • The objective correlative
  • T.S. Eliot
  • Stasis and objective form
  • James Joyce
  • Imagism
  • Pablo Picasso
  • F.S. Flint and Ezra Pound
  • Vorticism
  • Ezra Pound
  • The value of materials
  • Jean Dubuffet
  • Alogical structure.
  • Language within language
  • Rainer Maria Rilke
  • Plastic language
  • James Joyce
  • Art as the modern absolute
  • A battle of images
  • Dylan Thomas
  • The dynamics of metaphor
  • Hart Crane
  • Multiple vision
  • Max Ernst
  • The image in process
  • Sergei Eisenstein
  • The morality of the artist.
  • The courage of the artist
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
xix, 953 pages
Lccn
64007929
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)711024
Label
The modern tradition; : backgrounds of modern literature,, edited by Richard Ellmann and Charles Feidelson, Jr
Publication
Bibliography note
Bibliographical footnotes
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • André Malraux
  • W.B. Yeats
  • Art as ascetic religion
  • Gustave Flaubert
  • The mission of the artist
  • Rainer Maria Rilke
  • The artist as universal man
  • Paul Valéry
  • The art of life.
  • The intensity of the moment
  • Walter Pater
  • The interaction of imagination and nature.
  • Artificial sensation
  • Joris-Karl Huysmans
  • The reflexive image
  • André Gide
  • The completed image
  • W.B. Yeats
  • The aesthetic transformation of the earth
  • Rainer Maria Rilke
  • The artist and society.
  • An aesthetic mysticism
  • The imaginative faculty and the function of art
  • Gustave Flaubert
  • Art as evidence of order
  • E.M. Forster
  • The poet as revolutionary seer
  • Arthur Rimbaud
  • Art as aristocratic mystery
  • Stéphane Mallarmé
  • Poetry as a game of knowledge
  • W.H. Auden
  • Poetry as rite
  • Immanuel Kant
  • W.H. Auden
  • Art as establisher of value
  • Wallace Stevens
  • Realism: Objectivity.
  • A realism of love
  • George Eliot
  • False ideals exposed
  • Bernard Shaw
  • Heroic honesty
  • Gustave Flaubert
  • The coalescence of mind and nature
  • Dunghills as artistic material
  • Anton Chekhov
  • Historical determinism.
  • Society as historical organism
  • Honoré de Balzac
  • Art as historical product
  • Hippolyte Taine
  • Shortcomings of Taine's theory
  • Gustave Flaubert
  • Man as the creature of history
  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  • Leo Tolstoy
  • Naturalistic determinism.
  • Man as natural mechanism
  • Theodore Dreiser
  • Clinical realism
  • Edmond and Jules de Goncourt
  • The novel as social science
  • Emile Zola
  • A naturalistic manifesto
  • August Strindberg
  • The penetration of things
  • The fad of naturalism
  • Edmond and Jules de Goncourt
  • Melioristic realism.
  • Art as ethical communication
  • Leo Tolstoy
  • Prophetic realism
  • F.M. Dostoevsky
  • The counter-religions of humanity and art
  • George Sand and Gustave Flaubert
  • The counter-claims of content and form
  • Rainer Maria Rilke
  • H.G. Wells and Henry James
  • Socialist realism.
  • Social reality as class struggle
  • Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels
  • The economic sources of consciousness
  • Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels
  • The limitations of formalism
  • Leon Trotsky
  • Historical truth in fiction
  • Georg Lukács
  • Concrete art
  • A new realism.
  • Dehumanizing nature
  • Alain Robbe-Grillet
  • Nature: Struggle.
  • The struggle for existence and natural selection
  • Charles Darwin
  • The will in nature
  • Arthur Schopenhauer
  • Organicism.
  • Nature as organism
  • Hans Arp
  • A.N. Whitehead
  • Nature, man, and art
  • Rainer Maria Rilke
  • The life of the hawthorn
  • Marcel Proust
  • Natural joy
  • André Gide
  • The death of Pan
  • D.H. Lawrence
  • Mechanical force.
  • Symbolism. Imagination and nature: The revolt against nature.
  • Symbolic nature.
  • The new multiverse
  • Henry Adams
  • The joy of mechanical force
  • F.T. Marinetti
  • The physics of human character
  • D.H. Lawrence
  • Indeterminacy.
  • Pluralism, pragmatism, and instrumental truth
  • William James
  • Thought as a natural event
  • The eternal world of vision
  • John Dewey
  • Non-objective science and uncertainty
  • Werner Heisenberg
  • Cultural history: Idealism.
  • History as the self-realization of spirit
  • G.W.F Hegel
  • History as human self-knowledge
  • Benedetto Croce
  • Patterns of repetition.
  • The three ages
  • William Blake
  • Giambattista Vico
  • Eternal recurrence
  • Friedrich Nietzsche
  • The organic logic of history
  • Oswald Spengler
  • History and imagination.
  • History as symbolic reality
  • W.B. Yeats
  • The triumph of art over history
  • André Malraux
  • Natural apocalypse
  • Religion and history.
  • The historical meaning of Christianity
  • Nicolas Berdyaev
  • Primitive survivals.
  • The pre-human in the human
  • Charles Darwin
  • The savage in the human
  • Sir James G. Frazer
  • An archaic mystery
  • Henry Miller
  • William Wordsworth
  • The unconscious: Unreason and reason.
  • The demoniac
  • Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
  • Energy and reason
  • William Blake
  • Will and knowledge
  • Arthur Schopenhauer
  • Dionysos and Apollo
  • Friedrich Nietzsche
  • The Freudian unconscious.
  • The temple of nature
  • The structure of the unconscious
  • Sigmund Freud
  • The instincts
  • Sigmund Freud
  • The theory of dreams
  • Sigmund Freud
  • The Oedipus complex
  • Sigmund Freud
  • The origins of culture
  • Sigmund Freud
  • Charles Baudelaire
  • The significance of Freud
  • Thomas Mann
  • Liberation of the unconscious.
  • A non-Freudian unconscious
  • D.H. Lawrence
  • Dadaism
  • Tristan Tzara
  • Surrealism
  • André Breton
  • Myth: Myth in primitive thought.
  • Symbol as revelation
  • The king of the wood
  • Sir James G. Frazer
  • The social psychology of myth
  • Bronislaw Malinowski
  • The validity and form of mythical thought
  • Ernst Cassirer
  • The collective unconscious.
  • The collective unconscious and archetypes
  • C.G. Jung
  • The psychological function of archetypes
  • W.B. Yeats
  • C.G. Jung
  • The principal archetypes
  • C.G. Jung
  • Myth and literature.
  • Modern mythology
  • Friedrich Schlegel
  • Imaginative types
  • Victor Hugo
  • The folk and the myth
  • Richard Wagner
  • Eternal genesis
  • Visionary history
  • William Blake
  • Myth as memory
  • Nicolas Berdyaev
  • Psychoanalysis, the lived myth, and fiction
  • Thomas Mann
  • Myth and literary classicism
  • T.S. Eliot
  • Self-consciousness: Self-realization.
  • An experiment in self-revelation
  • The priority of art
  • Paul Klee
  • Jean-Jacques Rousseau
  • The value of inconsistency
  • André Gide
  • The living self
  • D.H. Lawrence
  • The self and reality
  • Rainer Maria Rilke
  • An Expressionist credo
  • Wassily Kandinsky
  • The field of consciousness.
  • Imagination and thought: The state of doubt.
  • Centers of consciousness
  • Henry James
  • The stream of consciousness
  • William James
  • Duration
  • Henri Bergson
  • The recapturing of time
  • Marcel Proust
  • The divided self.
  • The ironic consciousness
  • Escape from ideas
  • Friedrich Schlegel
  • The contrite consciousness
  • G.W.F. Hegel
  • Alienation
  • Karl Marx
  • Indirect communication
  • Søren Kierkegaard
  • The masks of truth
  • Friedrich Nietzsche
  • The anti-self
  • Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
  • W.B. Yeats
  • Freedom.
  • Sympathy and asceticism
  • Arthur Schopenhauer
  • Self-overcoming
  • Friedrich Nietzsche
  • The perverse self
  • F.M. Dostoevsky
  • Existence: The definition of existence.
  • The individual and the crowd
  • Negative capability
  • Søren Kierkegaard
  • Concrete existence and abstract system
  • Søren Kierkegaard
  • The free thinker and the consensus
  • Friedrich Nietzsche
  • Subjective will and objective truth
  • Friedrich Nietzsche
  • Moments of existence.
  • The fact of absurdity
  • Albert Camus
  • John Keats
  • Existence precedes essence
  • Jean-Paul Sartre
  • Choice
  • Søren Kierkegaard
  • Choice in a world without God
  • Jean-Paul Sartre
  • Dread reveals nothing
  • Martin Heidegger
  • Dread as education toward faith
  • Søren Kierkegaard
  • Art without conclusions
  • Authenticity
  • Jean-Paul Sartre
  • Value in existence.
  • Absurd freedom
  • Albert Camus
  • Commitment
  • Jean-Paul Sartre
  • Faith by virtue of the absurd
  • Søren Kierkegaard
  • The will to communicate
  • Gustave Flaubert
  • Karl Jaspers
  • The common condition of man
  • Jean-Paul Sartre
  • The primary words
  • Martin Buber
  • The encompassing
  • Karl Jaspers
  • Recollection of being
  • Martin Heidegger
  • Faith: Christianity and Christendom.
  • The role of thought in poetry.
  • The Lord's prayer modernized
  • William Blake
  • A hypocritical generation
  • Søren Kierkegaard
  • Christ and the Grand Inquisitor
  • F.M. Dostoevsky
  • Deified man.
  • God in man
  • William Blake
  • The death of God and the antichrist
  • Poetry, language, and thought
  • Friedrich Nietzsche
  • Poeticized religion.
  • The finer spirit of knowledge
  • Matthew Arnold
  • An allegory of human life
  • George Santayana
  • Paganized Christianity.
  • The resurrection of the body
  • D.H. Lawrence
  • Salvation on earth
  • Oscar Wilde
  • Paul Valéry
  • André Gide
  • Orthodoxy.
  • The errors of André Gide
  • Paul Claudel
  • Man becomes God
  • Charles Baudelaire
  • The errors of modern rationalism
  • Jacques Maritain
  • The modern confusion of categories
  • T.E. Hulme
  • Pseudo-statements
  • The one and only God
  • Karl Barth
  • The state of doubt.
  • The meaning of meaninglessness
  • Paul Tillich
  • I.A. Richards
  • Sensibility and thought in metaphysical poetry
  • T.S. Eliot
  • The state of affirmation.
  • The acceptance of untruth
  • Friedrich Nietzsche
  • The conquest of skepticism
  • W.B. Yeats
  • The unnatural will to art
  • The autonomy of art: The doctrine of purity.
  • The didactic heresy
  • Charles Baudelaire
  • The improvidence of art
  • Oscar Wilde
  • Literature as music-drama
  • Richard Wagner
  • Poetry as incantation
  • Stéphane Mallarmé
  • Pure painting
  • Rainer Maria Rilke
  • Guillaume Apollinaire
  • The non-picture
  • Marcel Duchamp
  • The purification of fiction.
  • The novel of consciousness
  • Virginia Woolf
  • Style as absolute
  • Gustave Flaubert
  • The pure novel
  • André Gide
  • Art as individual idea
  • The objective artifact.
  • The impersonality of art
  • Gustave Flaubert
  • Artistic objectivity
  • Rainer Maria Rilke
  • The objective correlative
  • T.S. Eliot
  • Stasis and objective form
  • James Joyce
  • Imagism
  • Pablo Picasso
  • F.S. Flint and Ezra Pound
  • Vorticism
  • Ezra Pound
  • The value of materials
  • Jean Dubuffet
  • Alogical structure.
  • Language within language
  • Rainer Maria Rilke
  • Plastic language
  • James Joyce
  • Art as the modern absolute
  • A battle of images
  • Dylan Thomas
  • The dynamics of metaphor
  • Hart Crane
  • Multiple vision
  • Max Ernst
  • The image in process
  • Sergei Eisenstein
  • The morality of the artist.
  • The courage of the artist
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
xix, 953 pages
Lccn
64007929
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)711024

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  • Mugar Memorial LibraryBorrow it
    771 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.350723 -71.108227
  • Music LibraryBorrow it
    771 Commonwealth Avenue, 2nd Floor, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.350723 -71.108227
  • Pikering Educational Resources LibraryBorrow it
    2 Silber Way, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.349804 -71.101425
  • School of Theology LibraryBorrow it
    745 Commonwealth Avenue, 2nd Floor, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.350494 -71.107235
  • Science & Engineering LibraryBorrow it
    38 Cummington Mall, Boston, MA, 02215, US
    42.348472 -71.102257
  • Stone Science LibraryBorrow it
    675 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA, 02445, US
    42.350103 -71.103784
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