The Resource The nature of emotion : fundamental questions, edited by Paul Ekman, Richard J. Davidson

The nature of emotion : fundamental questions, edited by Paul Ekman, Richard J. Davidson

Label
The nature of emotion : fundamental questions
Title
The nature of emotion
Title remainder
fundamental questions
Statement of responsibility
edited by Paul Ekman, Richard J. Davidson
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
The editors of this unique volume have selected 24 leading emotion theorists and asked them to address 12 fundamental questions about the subject of emotion. For example; Are there basic emotions? How do you distinguish emotions from moods, temperament, and emotional traits? Can we control our emotions? Can emotions be non-conscious? What is the relation between emotion and memory? What develops in emotional development? Each chapter addresses a different one of these fundamental questions about emotion, with often divergent answers from several of leading researchers represented here: James Averill, Gordon Bower, Linda Camras, Lee Clark, Gerald Clore, Richard Davidson, Judy Dunn, Paul Ekman, Phoebe Ellsworth, Nico Frijda, Hill Goldsmith, Jeffrey Gray, Carroll Izard, Jerome Kaga, Richard Lazarus, Joseph Le Doux, Robert Levenson, Jaak Panksepp, Mary Rothbart, Klaus Shere, Richard Shweder, David Watson, and Robert Zajonc. At the end of each chapter, the editors--Ekman and Davidson--highlight the areas of agreement and disagreement about each of the 12 questions about emotion. In the final chapter, Affective Science: A Research Agenda, the editors describe the research they believe would help answer each of the questions. Not a textbook offering a single viewpoint, The Nature of Emotion, uniquely reveals the central issues in emotion research and theory in the words of many of the leading scientists working in the field today. It is ideal for students, researchers, and clinicians interested in emotion
Member of
Cataloging source
DLC
Index
index present
LC call number
BF531
LC item number
.N38 1994
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
NLM call number
  • 1994 L-556
  • BF 531
NLM item number
N285 1994
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Ekman, Paul
  • Davidson, Richard J
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Emotions
  • Emotions
  • Emocao
  • Emoties
  • Émotions
  • Aufsatzsammlung
  • Gefühl
  • Gefühlspsychologie
  • Émotions
  • Humeur (psychologie)
  • Affect (psychologie)
  • Sentiments
  • Emotions
Label
The nature of emotion : fundamental questions, edited by Paul Ekman, Richard J. Davidson
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 431-475) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Klaus R. Scherer
  • "You're not sick, you're just in love" : emotion as an interpretive system
  • Richard A. Shweder
  • Afterward
  • Paul Ekman and Richard J. Davidson
  • Are there basic emotions?
  • In the eyes of the beholder
  • James R. Averill
  • All emotions are basic
  • Paul Ekman
  • The basics of basic emotion
  • Jaak Panksepp
  • Toward a concept of "modal emotions"
  • H.H. Goldsmith
  • Distinctions among emotions, moods, and temperamental qualities
  • Jerome Kagan
  • The stable and unstable in emotion
  • Richard Lazarus
  • Basic emotions ramify widely in the brain : yielding many concepts that cannot be distinguished unambiguously-- yet
  • Jaak Panksepp
  • Emotions, moods, traits, and temperaments : conceptual distinctions and empirical findings
  • David Watson and Lee Anna Clark
  • Afterward
  • How are emotions distinguished from moods, temperament, and other related affective constructs?
  • Richard J. Davidson and Paul Ekman
  • On emotion, mood, and related affective constructs
  • Richard J. Davidson
  • Moods, emotions, and traits
  • Paul Ekman
  • Varieties of effect : emotions and episodes, moods, and sentiments
  • Nico H. Frijda
  • Parsing the emotional domain from a developmental perspective
  • Robert W. Levenson
  • Emotion serves to decouple stimulus and response
  • Klaus R. Scherer
  • Distinguishing functional from dysfunctional affective responses
  • Lee Anna Clark and David Watson
  • Afterward
  • Paul Ekman and Richard J. Davidson
  • What is the function of emotions?
  • Emotions are many splendored things
  • James R. Averill
  • Why emotions are felt
  • Gerald L. Clore
  • Emotions as functional, most of the time
  • Nico H. Frijda
  • Human emotions : a functional view
  • Nico H. Frijda
  • Universal antecedents of the emotions
  • Richard Lazarus
  • Evidence for both universality and cultural specificity of emotion elicitation
  • Klaus R. Scherer
  • Afterward
  • Paul Ekman and Richard J. Davidson
  • How is evidence of universals in antecedents of emotion explained?
  • It's a small world, but a large stage
  • James R. Averill
  • Antecedent events and emotion metaphors
  • Paul Ekman
  • Some reasons to expect universal antecedents of emotion
  • Phoebe C. Ellsworth
  • Universal antecedents exist, and are interesting
  • Carroll E. Izard
  • Appraisal : the long and short of it
  • Richard Lazarus
  • Cognitive-emotional interactions in the brain
  • Joseph E. LeDoux
  • A proper distinction between affective and cognitive process is essential for neuroscientific progress
  • Jaak Panksepp
  • An emotion's occurrence depends on the relevance of an event to the organism's goal/need hierarchy
  • Klaus R. Scherer
  • Afterward
  • What are the minimal cognitive prerequisites for emotion?
  • Richard J. Davidson and Paul Ekman
  • Why emotions require cognition
  • Gerald L. Clore
  • Levels of thought and levels of emotion
  • Phoebe C. Ellsworth
  • Emotions require cognition, even if simple ones
  • Nico H. Frijda
  • Cognition is one of four types of emotion activating systems
  • Robert W. Levenson
  • The clearest physiological distinctions between emotions will be found among the circuits of the brain
  • Jaak Panksepp
  • Afterward
  • Richard J. Davidson and Paul Ekman
  • Is there emotion-specific physiology?
  • Complexities in the search for emotion-specific physiology
  • Richard J. Davidson
  • Three fundamental emotion systems
  • Jeffrey A. Gray
  • Emotion-specific physiological activity : don't forget about CNS physiology
  • Joseph E. LeDoux
  • The search for autonomic specificity
  • Paul Ekman and Richard J. Davidson
  • Can we control our emotions?
  • Emotions unbecoming and becoming
  • James R. Averill
  • The degree of emotional control depends on the kind of personal system involved
  • Joseph E. LeDoux
  • Emotional control : variations and consequences
  • Robert W. Levenson
  • Afterward
  • Richard J. Davidson and Paul Ekman
  • Can emotions be nonconscious?
  • Why emotions are never unconscious
  • Gerald L. Clore
  • Emotional processing, but not emotions, can occur unconsciously
  • Joseph E. LeDoux
  • Evidence for nonconscious emotions
  • Robert B. Zajonc
  • Afterward
  • Jaak Panksepp
  • Afterward
  • Richard J. Davidson and Paul Ekman
  • What is the relation between emotion and memory?
  • Some relations between emotions and memory
  • Gordon H. Bower
  • The past and present in emotion
  • Richard Lazarus
  • Memory versus emotional memory in the brain
  • Joseph E. LeDoux
  • Subjectivity may have evolved in the brain as a simple value-coding process that promotes the learning of new behaviors
  • Mary K. Rothbart
  • Afterward
  • Paul Ekman and Richard J. Davidson
  • How do individuals differ in emotion-related activity?
  • Honoring biology in the study of affective style
  • Richard J. Davidson
  • Personality dimensions and emotion systems
  • Jeffrey A. Gray
  • Individual difference in emotion
  • Richard Lazarus
  • Broad dimensions of temperament and personality
  • Richard Lazarus
  • Emotional development yields lots of "stuff"-- especially mind "stuff" that emerges from "brain" stuff
  • Jaak Panksepp
  • Emotional development : changes in reactivity and self-regulation
  • Mary K. Rothbart
  • Afterward
  • Richard J. Davidson and Paul Ekman
  • What develops in emotional development?
  • Two aspects of emotional development : expression and elicitation
  • Linda A. Camras
  • Experience and understanding of emotions, relationships, and membership in a particular culture
  • Judy Dunn
  • Intersystem connections
  • Carroll E. Izard
  • Meaning and emotional development
  • Jaak Panksepp
  • The vicissitudes of mood : a schematic model
  • David Watson and Lee Anna Clark
  • Afterward
  • Paul Ekman and Richard J. Davidson
  • What influences the subjective experience of emotion?
  • I feel, therefore I am--I think
  • James R. Averill
  • Why emotions vary in intensity
  • Gerald L. Clore
  • Emotional experience is an output of, not a cause of, emotional processing
  • Joseph E. LeDoux
  • Evolution constructed the potential for subjective experience within the neurodynamics of the mammalian brain
  • Epilogue. Affective science : a research agenda
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
xiv, 496 p.
Isbn
9780195089431
Isbn Type
(cloth : acid-free paper)
Lccn
94018638
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (OCoLC)30473538
  • (OCoLC)ocm30473538
Label
The nature of emotion : fundamental questions, edited by Paul Ekman, Richard J. Davidson
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 431-475) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Klaus R. Scherer
  • "You're not sick, you're just in love" : emotion as an interpretive system
  • Richard A. Shweder
  • Afterward
  • Paul Ekman and Richard J. Davidson
  • Are there basic emotions?
  • In the eyes of the beholder
  • James R. Averill
  • All emotions are basic
  • Paul Ekman
  • The basics of basic emotion
  • Jaak Panksepp
  • Toward a concept of "modal emotions"
  • H.H. Goldsmith
  • Distinctions among emotions, moods, and temperamental qualities
  • Jerome Kagan
  • The stable and unstable in emotion
  • Richard Lazarus
  • Basic emotions ramify widely in the brain : yielding many concepts that cannot be distinguished unambiguously-- yet
  • Jaak Panksepp
  • Emotions, moods, traits, and temperaments : conceptual distinctions and empirical findings
  • David Watson and Lee Anna Clark
  • Afterward
  • How are emotions distinguished from moods, temperament, and other related affective constructs?
  • Richard J. Davidson and Paul Ekman
  • On emotion, mood, and related affective constructs
  • Richard J. Davidson
  • Moods, emotions, and traits
  • Paul Ekman
  • Varieties of effect : emotions and episodes, moods, and sentiments
  • Nico H. Frijda
  • Parsing the emotional domain from a developmental perspective
  • Robert W. Levenson
  • Emotion serves to decouple stimulus and response
  • Klaus R. Scherer
  • Distinguishing functional from dysfunctional affective responses
  • Lee Anna Clark and David Watson
  • Afterward
  • Paul Ekman and Richard J. Davidson
  • What is the function of emotions?
  • Emotions are many splendored things
  • James R. Averill
  • Why emotions are felt
  • Gerald L. Clore
  • Emotions as functional, most of the time
  • Nico H. Frijda
  • Human emotions : a functional view
  • Nico H. Frijda
  • Universal antecedents of the emotions
  • Richard Lazarus
  • Evidence for both universality and cultural specificity of emotion elicitation
  • Klaus R. Scherer
  • Afterward
  • Paul Ekman and Richard J. Davidson
  • How is evidence of universals in antecedents of emotion explained?
  • It's a small world, but a large stage
  • James R. Averill
  • Antecedent events and emotion metaphors
  • Paul Ekman
  • Some reasons to expect universal antecedents of emotion
  • Phoebe C. Ellsworth
  • Universal antecedents exist, and are interesting
  • Carroll E. Izard
  • Appraisal : the long and short of it
  • Richard Lazarus
  • Cognitive-emotional interactions in the brain
  • Joseph E. LeDoux
  • A proper distinction between affective and cognitive process is essential for neuroscientific progress
  • Jaak Panksepp
  • An emotion's occurrence depends on the relevance of an event to the organism's goal/need hierarchy
  • Klaus R. Scherer
  • Afterward
  • What are the minimal cognitive prerequisites for emotion?
  • Richard J. Davidson and Paul Ekman
  • Why emotions require cognition
  • Gerald L. Clore
  • Levels of thought and levels of emotion
  • Phoebe C. Ellsworth
  • Emotions require cognition, even if simple ones
  • Nico H. Frijda
  • Cognition is one of four types of emotion activating systems
  • Robert W. Levenson
  • The clearest physiological distinctions between emotions will be found among the circuits of the brain
  • Jaak Panksepp
  • Afterward
  • Richard J. Davidson and Paul Ekman
  • Is there emotion-specific physiology?
  • Complexities in the search for emotion-specific physiology
  • Richard J. Davidson
  • Three fundamental emotion systems
  • Jeffrey A. Gray
  • Emotion-specific physiological activity : don't forget about CNS physiology
  • Joseph E. LeDoux
  • The search for autonomic specificity
  • Paul Ekman and Richard J. Davidson
  • Can we control our emotions?
  • Emotions unbecoming and becoming
  • James R. Averill
  • The degree of emotional control depends on the kind of personal system involved
  • Joseph E. LeDoux
  • Emotional control : variations and consequences
  • Robert W. Levenson
  • Afterward
  • Richard J. Davidson and Paul Ekman
  • Can emotions be nonconscious?
  • Why emotions are never unconscious
  • Gerald L. Clore
  • Emotional processing, but not emotions, can occur unconsciously
  • Joseph E. LeDoux
  • Evidence for nonconscious emotions
  • Robert B. Zajonc
  • Afterward
  • Jaak Panksepp
  • Afterward
  • Richard J. Davidson and Paul Ekman
  • What is the relation between emotion and memory?
  • Some relations between emotions and memory
  • Gordon H. Bower
  • The past and present in emotion
  • Richard Lazarus
  • Memory versus emotional memory in the brain
  • Joseph E. LeDoux
  • Subjectivity may have evolved in the brain as a simple value-coding process that promotes the learning of new behaviors
  • Mary K. Rothbart
  • Afterward
  • Paul Ekman and Richard J. Davidson
  • How do individuals differ in emotion-related activity?
  • Honoring biology in the study of affective style
  • Richard J. Davidson
  • Personality dimensions and emotion systems
  • Jeffrey A. Gray
  • Individual difference in emotion
  • Richard Lazarus
  • Broad dimensions of temperament and personality
  • Richard Lazarus
  • Emotional development yields lots of "stuff"-- especially mind "stuff" that emerges from "brain" stuff
  • Jaak Panksepp
  • Emotional development : changes in reactivity and self-regulation
  • Mary K. Rothbart
  • Afterward
  • Richard J. Davidson and Paul Ekman
  • What develops in emotional development?
  • Two aspects of emotional development : expression and elicitation
  • Linda A. Camras
  • Experience and understanding of emotions, relationships, and membership in a particular culture
  • Judy Dunn
  • Intersystem connections
  • Carroll E. Izard
  • Meaning and emotional development
  • Jaak Panksepp
  • The vicissitudes of mood : a schematic model
  • David Watson and Lee Anna Clark
  • Afterward
  • Paul Ekman and Richard J. Davidson
  • What influences the subjective experience of emotion?
  • I feel, therefore I am--I think
  • James R. Averill
  • Why emotions vary in intensity
  • Gerald L. Clore
  • Emotional experience is an output of, not a cause of, emotional processing
  • Joseph E. LeDoux
  • Evolution constructed the potential for subjective experience within the neurodynamics of the mammalian brain
  • Epilogue. Affective science : a research agenda
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
xiv, 496 p.
Isbn
9780195089431
Isbn Type
(cloth : acid-free paper)
Lccn
94018638
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (OCoLC)30473538
  • (OCoLC)ocm30473538

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