The Resource The neurobiology of Circadian timing, edited by Andries Kalsbeek ... [et al.], (electronic resource)

The neurobiology of Circadian timing, edited by Andries Kalsbeek ... [et al.], (electronic resource)

Label
The neurobiology of Circadian timing
Title
The neurobiology of Circadian timing
Statement of responsibility
edited by Andries Kalsbeek ... [et al.]
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
  • eng
  • eng
Summary
Leading authors review the state-of-the-art in their field of investigation, and provide their views and perspectives for future researchChapters are extensively referenced to provide readers with a comprehensive list of resources on the topics coveredAll chapters include comprehensive background information and are written in a clear form that is also accessible to the non-specialistLeading authors review the state-of-the-art in their field of investigation, and provide their views and perspectives for future researchChapters are extensively referenced to provide readers w
Is Subseries of
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
Dewey number
  • 573.8
  • 616.8
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Language note
English
LC call number
QP355.2
LC item number
.N4833 2012
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Kalsbeek, A.
Series statement
Progress in brain research
Series volume
199
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Neurobiology
  • Circadian rhythms
Label
The neurobiology of Circadian timing, edited by Andries Kalsbeek ... [et al.], (electronic resource)
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Description based upon print version of record
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Contents
  • Front Cover; The Neurobiology of Circadian Timing; Copyright; List of Contributors; Preface; Contents; Chapter 1: How rod, cone, and melanopsin photoreceptors come together to enlighten the mammalian circadian clock; Methods of study; Relying on rods; Inconstant cones; Melanopsin; A conceptual model; Assumptions, implications, and uncertainties; The role of cones; Temporal frequency tuning of melanopsin; Photoreceptor sensitivity ranges; Moving from input to output; Summary and conclusions; References; Chapter 2: Melanopsin phototransduction: Slowly emerging from the dark; Introduction
  • pRGC subtypesFunctional differences between pRGC subtypes; Retinal connections; pRGC subtypes mediate different physiological responses to light; Melanopsin phototransduction; Step 1: Light absorption by melanopsin photopigment; Step 2: Activation of a G-protein signaling pathway; Step 3: Phospholipase C activation; Step 4: TRP channel activation; Step 5: Activation of voltage-gated ion channels and action potential firing; Gaps in the current model of melanopsin phototransduction; Role of protein kinases: Desensitization, adaptation, and termination of melanopsin signaling; Scaffold proteins
  • Gβ subunitsVariable responses in pRGCs; Conclusions; Acknowledgments; References; Chapter 3: Circadian clocks: Lessons from fish; Introduction; Zebrafish: A genetic model species; A model for studying embryonic development; Chronobiology and the zebrafish; Zebrafish and the vertebrate core clock mechanism; Searching for new clock genes using zebrafish; Multiple clock genes in fish; Starting the clock during development; Light-entrainable peripheral clocks; Light-inducible clock gene expression; Blind cavefish reveal circadian clock photoreceptors; Concluding remarks; Acknowledgments
  • ReferencesChapter 4: Two clocks in the brain: An update of the morning and evening oscillator model in Drosophila; Introduction; The dual oscillator model; The clock network in the Drosophila brain and the possibility to manipulate selected clock neurons; The original studies of Stoleru et al. (2004) and Grima et al. (2004); Dominance of the M cells under short days and of the E cells under long days; Light activates output from the E cells and inhibits output from the M cells; Light accelerates the M cells and decelerates the E cells
  • M and E oscillators under moonlit nights and constant moonlightFlies adapting to different photoperiods; Simulation of dawn and dusk; Adaptation of the clock to different photoperiods occurs via light input through the photoreceptor organs and not via CRY; The PDF-positive l-LNvs play a crucial role in mediating light input from the eyes; The effects of temperature on M and E oscillators; Flies under natural-like temperature cycles; Interaction of light and temperature; The dual oscillator model appears too simple; E cells alone can drive two or even more activity components
  • Under certain circumstances, M cells alone can also drive two activity components
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (513 p.)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780444594549
Media category
computer
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (EBL)991971
  • (OCoLC)811502430
  • (SSID)ssj0000738529
  • (PQKBManifestationID)12341211
  • (PQKBTitleCode)TC0000738529
  • (PQKBWorkID)10811649
  • (PQKB)10456398
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC991971
  • (EXLCZ)992560000000089542
Label
The neurobiology of Circadian timing, edited by Andries Kalsbeek ... [et al.], (electronic resource)
Publication
Note
Description based upon print version of record
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Contents
  • Front Cover; The Neurobiology of Circadian Timing; Copyright; List of Contributors; Preface; Contents; Chapter 1: How rod, cone, and melanopsin photoreceptors come together to enlighten the mammalian circadian clock; Methods of study; Relying on rods; Inconstant cones; Melanopsin; A conceptual model; Assumptions, implications, and uncertainties; The role of cones; Temporal frequency tuning of melanopsin; Photoreceptor sensitivity ranges; Moving from input to output; Summary and conclusions; References; Chapter 2: Melanopsin phototransduction: Slowly emerging from the dark; Introduction
  • pRGC subtypesFunctional differences between pRGC subtypes; Retinal connections; pRGC subtypes mediate different physiological responses to light; Melanopsin phototransduction; Step 1: Light absorption by melanopsin photopigment; Step 2: Activation of a G-protein signaling pathway; Step 3: Phospholipase C activation; Step 4: TRP channel activation; Step 5: Activation of voltage-gated ion channels and action potential firing; Gaps in the current model of melanopsin phototransduction; Role of protein kinases: Desensitization, adaptation, and termination of melanopsin signaling; Scaffold proteins
  • Gβ subunitsVariable responses in pRGCs; Conclusions; Acknowledgments; References; Chapter 3: Circadian clocks: Lessons from fish; Introduction; Zebrafish: A genetic model species; A model for studying embryonic development; Chronobiology and the zebrafish; Zebrafish and the vertebrate core clock mechanism; Searching for new clock genes using zebrafish; Multiple clock genes in fish; Starting the clock during development; Light-entrainable peripheral clocks; Light-inducible clock gene expression; Blind cavefish reveal circadian clock photoreceptors; Concluding remarks; Acknowledgments
  • ReferencesChapter 4: Two clocks in the brain: An update of the morning and evening oscillator model in Drosophila; Introduction; The dual oscillator model; The clock network in the Drosophila brain and the possibility to manipulate selected clock neurons; The original studies of Stoleru et al. (2004) and Grima et al. (2004); Dominance of the M cells under short days and of the E cells under long days; Light activates output from the E cells and inhibits output from the M cells; Light accelerates the M cells and decelerates the E cells
  • M and E oscillators under moonlit nights and constant moonlightFlies adapting to different photoperiods; Simulation of dawn and dusk; Adaptation of the clock to different photoperiods occurs via light input through the photoreceptor organs and not via CRY; The PDF-positive l-LNvs play a crucial role in mediating light input from the eyes; The effects of temperature on M and E oscillators; Flies under natural-like temperature cycles; Interaction of light and temperature; The dual oscillator model appears too simple; E cells alone can drive two or even more activity components
  • Under certain circumstances, M cells alone can also drive two activity components
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (513 p.)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780444594549
Media category
computer
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (EBL)991971
  • (OCoLC)811502430
  • (SSID)ssj0000738529
  • (PQKBManifestationID)12341211
  • (PQKBTitleCode)TC0000738529
  • (PQKBWorkID)10811649
  • (PQKB)10456398
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC991971
  • (EXLCZ)992560000000089542

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