The Resource The philosophies of F.R. Tennant and John Dewey

The philosophies of F.R. Tennant and John Dewey

Label
The philosophies of F.R. Tennant and John Dewey
Title
The philosophies of F.R. Tennant and John Dewey
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1895-1977
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Buswell, J. Oliver
Index
no index present
LC call number
B1669.T44
LC item number
B8
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Tennant, Frederick Robert
  • Dewey, John
  • Tennant, Frederick Robert
  • Dewey, John
  • Dewey, John
  • Tennant, Frederick Robert
  • Knowledge, Theory of
  • Knowledge, Theory of
Label
The philosophies of F.R. Tennant and John Dewey
Link
http://hdl.handle.net/2027/mdp.39015082020275
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographies
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Preface -- The problem stated -- Definitions of general terms -- Empiricism, empirical -- Experience -- Pragmatism -- Tennant and Dewey -- Specialized terms -- Conclusion -- Part I: Analytical summary of tenants empiricism -- Introduction: Tennant's general position in philosophy -- Horton and Macintosh on Tennant -- Bertocci and Scudder on Tennant -- Chapter 1: Tennant's psychological genetic approach to knowledge -- Prima facie facts -- The order of knowing -- James Ward's psychology -- Tennant's atomism -- Tennant's sensationalism -- Associationism, detailed analysis of Tennant's psychology -- The "subject" of Tennant's psychology -- Erlebnis -- Hume on the "self" -- Tennant's dualism -- Development of genetic psychology -- Bode's view of the self -- Summary -- Conclusions -- Appendix A: Bode's view of the soul -- Chapter 2: Tennant's view of the nature of knowledge: phenomenalism -- Epistemology -- Transitional -- The categories; Aristotle -- Time and space, confusion and definition -- Augustine's view -- Definitions of time and space -- Categories of the understanding -- "Real" categories -- Substance -- Aristotle on matter and substance -- Tennant's dualism -- Thought and reason -- Theories of knowledge, rationalism -- Theories of knowledge, empiricism -- Theories of knowledge, realism, idealism, phenomenalism -- Tennant's symbols -- Tennant's phenomenalism compared with other systems -- Relativity of knowledge -- Tennant's use of phenomenalism -- Induction -- Probability -- The nature of belief -- Tennant as a theologian -- Summary of The nature of belief -- Tennant on the nature of religious experience -- Bertocci on Tennant's view of mysticism -- Hook on religious experience Scudder on Tennant's doctrine of religious experience -- Conclusion -- The nature and limitations of scientific knowledge -- Conclusion; Tennant's epistemology in general -- Appendix B: Epistemological categories, suggested; outline -- Chapter 3: Tennant's metaphysical conclusions -- Tennant's metaphysics, general statement -- Generalizations -- Is the world rational? -- Does man legislate for nature? -- Underwood on curved space -- Lamont on dimensionalism -- Meaning of "law" -- "Logical" necessity -- Law as self-subsistent -- Ontological necessity -- Law and mechanism -- Philosophical meaning of discontinuity -- Vis a tergo -- Explanation, rationality of the world -- Zecjmässigkeit ohne Zweck -- Cosmic teleology -- The ontological argument -- Anslem -- Descartes -- Leibnitz -- Kant -- Tennant on the ontological argument -- Teleology, general approach -- Rational mind and the ontal world -- Teleology in organisms -- Teleology in inorganic world -- Teleology in aesthetics -- Ethical teleology -- Synthetic view -- The nature of God -- Creation -- Time -- The infinitude of God -- Calvinistic use of "infinite" -- Perfection and immutability -- The view of Thomas Aquinas -- Thomas on immutability -- Transitional summary -- The absolute -- Personality -- Trinity -- Tennant on polytheism -- Omniscience -- The fact of evil -- "Best possible" -- Application -- Immanence -- Miracle -- Revelation -- Incarnation -- Conclusion -- Part II: Analytical summary of Dewey's empiricism -- Introduction: delimitations, not a study of Dewey's philosophy as a whole
  • Chapter 4: Dewey's psychology -- Dewey and Allport in the Schilpp volume -- Earliest period in Dewey's psychology -- Articles in mind -- Articles in Bibliotheca Sacra -- Article in Andover Review -- The causal and the occasional -- An example of Dewey's Hegelianism -- "The reflex arc concept in psychology" -- Dewey's changing view of the personal ego -- Dewey's article, "The vanishing subject... of William James" -- Dewey's article, "The ego as cause" -- Attempts to account for Erlebnis -- Dewey's five steps, conclusion -- The psychology of Human nature and conduct -- Conclusions -- Chapter 5: Dewey's epistemology -- Overlapping of epistemology and ontology -- Relation of logic to Dewey's earlier writings -- The quest for certainty -- Dewey's use of Aristotle -- Primitive cultural anthropology -- Discovery of antecedent facts and principles, the zero sign -- The all or none device -- Five-fold development of Quest -- (1) Separation between theory and practice -- (2) Modern science in conflict -- Eight philosophies of certainty -- (3) Scientific procedure and instrumentalism -- Two degrees of control, astronomy -- Greek attitude toward material nature -- "Data" substituted for "objects" -- Events -- Knowing by doing -- Dobzhansky on science and certainty -- Bridgman -- Eddington -- Bridgman and Newton -- "Experimental empiricism" -- Dewey on Newton, hypotheses -- Descarte's rationalism -- Newton's theory of atoms -- Dewey on Newton's view of time and space -- Dewey and Einstein -- Einstein on Euclid -- The Heisenberg principle and Newton -- Laplace -- The principle of indeterminacy -- Three a priori negatives -- Truth and falsehood reversible -- The unconscious normative -- (4) Destruction of barriers between theory and practice -- (5) Effect of instrumentalism -- Revelation and incarnation -- Dewey's Copernican revolution -- The intellectualist's fallacy -- The problem of evil -- Religion and fact -- Logic, the theory of inquiry -- Logical inquiry, the cause of logical forms -- Ab extra -- Dewey on Peirce -- Three kinds of relation -- Dewey on paper money -- Necessary logical relationships -- Theory of relativity -- Carelessness -- Conclusion -- Chapter 6: Dewey's metaphysics -- General introduction; Garnett -- Experience and nature -- Interdict against nouns -- Causality -- Historismus -- Woodbridge on Dewey's view of history -- "Experience" and "house" -- Subjects and objects -- Definition of consciousness -- Dewey's vitalism (animism) -- Carelessness -- Art as experience -- Vitalism -- A common faith -- Anti-supernaturalism -- Anti-materialism -- Lamprecht and Flint -- Verifiable reality -- Liberalism and fundamentalism -- Three stages of history -- The problem of evil -- God and atheism -- The religious and religions -- God or no God -- Ignorance of church history -- Dewey's creed that cannot be shaken -- Summary and conclusion -- Negatives -- The positive -- Summary, conclusions and recommendations -- Summary -- Summary, psychology -- Summary, epistemology -- Summary, metaphysics -- Conclusion, psychology -- Conclusion, epistemology -- Conclusion, metaphysics -- Recommendations for further research
Dimensions
22 cm
Extent
xvii, 516 pages
Lccn
51009245
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
System control number
  • (OCoLC)01493893
  • (OCoLC)ocm01493893
Label
The philosophies of F.R. Tennant and John Dewey
Link
http://hdl.handle.net/2027/mdp.39015082020275
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographies
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Preface -- The problem stated -- Definitions of general terms -- Empiricism, empirical -- Experience -- Pragmatism -- Tennant and Dewey -- Specialized terms -- Conclusion -- Part I: Analytical summary of tenants empiricism -- Introduction: Tennant's general position in philosophy -- Horton and Macintosh on Tennant -- Bertocci and Scudder on Tennant -- Chapter 1: Tennant's psychological genetic approach to knowledge -- Prima facie facts -- The order of knowing -- James Ward's psychology -- Tennant's atomism -- Tennant's sensationalism -- Associationism, detailed analysis of Tennant's psychology -- The "subject" of Tennant's psychology -- Erlebnis -- Hume on the "self" -- Tennant's dualism -- Development of genetic psychology -- Bode's view of the self -- Summary -- Conclusions -- Appendix A: Bode's view of the soul -- Chapter 2: Tennant's view of the nature of knowledge: phenomenalism -- Epistemology -- Transitional -- The categories; Aristotle -- Time and space, confusion and definition -- Augustine's view -- Definitions of time and space -- Categories of the understanding -- "Real" categories -- Substance -- Aristotle on matter and substance -- Tennant's dualism -- Thought and reason -- Theories of knowledge, rationalism -- Theories of knowledge, empiricism -- Theories of knowledge, realism, idealism, phenomenalism -- Tennant's symbols -- Tennant's phenomenalism compared with other systems -- Relativity of knowledge -- Tennant's use of phenomenalism -- Induction -- Probability -- The nature of belief -- Tennant as a theologian -- Summary of The nature of belief -- Tennant on the nature of religious experience -- Bertocci on Tennant's view of mysticism -- Hook on religious experience Scudder on Tennant's doctrine of religious experience -- Conclusion -- The nature and limitations of scientific knowledge -- Conclusion; Tennant's epistemology in general -- Appendix B: Epistemological categories, suggested; outline -- Chapter 3: Tennant's metaphysical conclusions -- Tennant's metaphysics, general statement -- Generalizations -- Is the world rational? -- Does man legislate for nature? -- Underwood on curved space -- Lamont on dimensionalism -- Meaning of "law" -- "Logical" necessity -- Law as self-subsistent -- Ontological necessity -- Law and mechanism -- Philosophical meaning of discontinuity -- Vis a tergo -- Explanation, rationality of the world -- Zecjmässigkeit ohne Zweck -- Cosmic teleology -- The ontological argument -- Anslem -- Descartes -- Leibnitz -- Kant -- Tennant on the ontological argument -- Teleology, general approach -- Rational mind and the ontal world -- Teleology in organisms -- Teleology in inorganic world -- Teleology in aesthetics -- Ethical teleology -- Synthetic view -- The nature of God -- Creation -- Time -- The infinitude of God -- Calvinistic use of "infinite" -- Perfection and immutability -- The view of Thomas Aquinas -- Thomas on immutability -- Transitional summary -- The absolute -- Personality -- Trinity -- Tennant on polytheism -- Omniscience -- The fact of evil -- "Best possible" -- Application -- Immanence -- Miracle -- Revelation -- Incarnation -- Conclusion -- Part II: Analytical summary of Dewey's empiricism -- Introduction: delimitations, not a study of Dewey's philosophy as a whole
  • Chapter 4: Dewey's psychology -- Dewey and Allport in the Schilpp volume -- Earliest period in Dewey's psychology -- Articles in mind -- Articles in Bibliotheca Sacra -- Article in Andover Review -- The causal and the occasional -- An example of Dewey's Hegelianism -- "The reflex arc concept in psychology" -- Dewey's changing view of the personal ego -- Dewey's article, "The vanishing subject... of William James" -- Dewey's article, "The ego as cause" -- Attempts to account for Erlebnis -- Dewey's five steps, conclusion -- The psychology of Human nature and conduct -- Conclusions -- Chapter 5: Dewey's epistemology -- Overlapping of epistemology and ontology -- Relation of logic to Dewey's earlier writings -- The quest for certainty -- Dewey's use of Aristotle -- Primitive cultural anthropology -- Discovery of antecedent facts and principles, the zero sign -- The all or none device -- Five-fold development of Quest -- (1) Separation between theory and practice -- (2) Modern science in conflict -- Eight philosophies of certainty -- (3) Scientific procedure and instrumentalism -- Two degrees of control, astronomy -- Greek attitude toward material nature -- "Data" substituted for "objects" -- Events -- Knowing by doing -- Dobzhansky on science and certainty -- Bridgman -- Eddington -- Bridgman and Newton -- "Experimental empiricism" -- Dewey on Newton, hypotheses -- Descarte's rationalism -- Newton's theory of atoms -- Dewey on Newton's view of time and space -- Dewey and Einstein -- Einstein on Euclid -- The Heisenberg principle and Newton -- Laplace -- The principle of indeterminacy -- Three a priori negatives -- Truth and falsehood reversible -- The unconscious normative -- (4) Destruction of barriers between theory and practice -- (5) Effect of instrumentalism -- Revelation and incarnation -- Dewey's Copernican revolution -- The intellectualist's fallacy -- The problem of evil -- Religion and fact -- Logic, the theory of inquiry -- Logical inquiry, the cause of logical forms -- Ab extra -- Dewey on Peirce -- Three kinds of relation -- Dewey on paper money -- Necessary logical relationships -- Theory of relativity -- Carelessness -- Conclusion -- Chapter 6: Dewey's metaphysics -- General introduction; Garnett -- Experience and nature -- Interdict against nouns -- Causality -- Historismus -- Woodbridge on Dewey's view of history -- "Experience" and "house" -- Subjects and objects -- Definition of consciousness -- Dewey's vitalism (animism) -- Carelessness -- Art as experience -- Vitalism -- A common faith -- Anti-supernaturalism -- Anti-materialism -- Lamprecht and Flint -- Verifiable reality -- Liberalism and fundamentalism -- Three stages of history -- The problem of evil -- God and atheism -- The religious and religions -- God or no God -- Ignorance of church history -- Dewey's creed that cannot be shaken -- Summary and conclusion -- Negatives -- The positive -- Summary, conclusions and recommendations -- Summary -- Summary, psychology -- Summary, epistemology -- Summary, metaphysics -- Conclusion, psychology -- Conclusion, epistemology -- Conclusion, metaphysics -- Recommendations for further research
Dimensions
22 cm
Extent
xvii, 516 pages
Lccn
51009245
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
System control number
  • (OCoLC)01493893
  • (OCoLC)ocm01493893

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