The Resource The priests and prophets,, by Jacob Hoschander

The priests and prophets,, by Jacob Hoschander

Label
The priests and prophets,
Title
The priests and prophets,
Statement of responsibility
by Jacob Hoschander
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1874-1933
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Hoschander, Jacob
Index
no index present
LC call number
BM170
LC item number
.H6
Literary form
non fiction
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Judaism
  • Jews
  • Priests, Jewish
  • Prophets
  • Jews
  • Judaism
  • Priests, Jewish
  • Prophets
  • Priester
Label
The priests and prophets,, by Jacob Hoschander
Link
http://hdl.handle.net/2027/uc1.$b8428
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • I : The priestly class Kemarim ; The abolition of their priestly office ; Solomon's foreign sanctuaries ; Their purpose ; The foreign priests of these sanctuaries ; The ancestral religion of the Canaanites under Solomon's reign ; Their status as aliens ; Their treatment ; Their support of Jeroboam ; The Aryan Hittites ; Their religious influence ; The Hittite bull-god ; The Baalim-worship ; Jeroboam's syncretisitc Jahveh-worship ; The religious attitudes of the Israelites ; Jeroboam's Canaanitic military force ; His election ; The loyal adherents of the Davidic dynasty in North-Israel ; The recoginition of the Canaanites as equal citizens ; Their anomalous position among the Israelites ; The amalgamation of the Canaanitic and Israelitish creeds ; Jeroboams's own religious conception ; The identification of Jahveh with Baal ; The Baalim representatives and emanations of the ancient supreme god of Palestine ; Historical parallels in Israel's history ; The priests of Jeroboam's sanctuaries ; The priestly rank of kings and chiefs ; The Festival of Jahveh as God of agriculture in the 8th month ; The position of the Vernal Equinox in Taurus ; The Asheroth and Asherim ; No Asherah in Jeroboam's sanctuaries ; His innovations of a ritual character ; The veneration of his memory by the pious Jehu-dynasty ; The attitude of the prophets toward his innovation ; The origin of the Mosaic rituals ; The three religious stages ; The Mosaic Monotheism ; State-monotheism and National monotheism ; The identification of the Baalim with the host of heaven ; The Heavenly Court in the visions of the prophets ; Jeremiah's monotheistic conception ; Deutero-Isaiah's rigid monotheism ; The belief in angels and Monotheism ; Zechariah's and Daniel's conception of angels ; The definition of angels by Maimonides
  • II : The popular conception of religion ; The prophetic teachings ; The ill success of the prophetic activity ; Isaiah's view on sacrifices and rituals ; Ritualistic performances by immoral persons ; The breach between the prophets and the priests ; Idealism versus realism ; The liberal attitude of the priests ; The piety of Judean kings due to their influence ; Their chief function of teaching ; Their teaching for hire ; The protest of Micah ; The ignorance of the poor ; The priestly principle of Truth and Peach ; Different views concerning external forms of worship ; The divine origin of the priestly ordinances ; The statement of Amos on sacrifices ; Its various interpretations Hosea's view ; The erroneous interpretation of Isaiah's views on rituals ; Micah's position ; His fundamental religious principles ; Psalm 15 ; Micah's Messianic message ; Jeremiah's conception concerning sacrifices ; Its correct interpretation ; His exhortation on Sabbath-observance ; The priestly prophet Joel ; His concern for the regularity of sacrifices ; The date of the drought ; Jeremiah's reference to the same event ; A comparison of Jeremiah's address with that of Joel ; Joel a true representative of the priests ; His style ; The criterion of a true prophet ; The conditional nature of prophecy ; The priestly prophet Ezekiel
  • III : The conception of piety and religious devotion in antiquity ; Moral conduct as the consequence of religious observances ; Demands beyond human power ; An excessive number of rituals ; The symbolic character of rituals ; A perfect state of human society ; The fear of punishment ; The principle "Fear of the Lord" ; Its rare occurrence in the prophetic literature ; The knowledge of the Lord ; The investigation of its meaning ; Hosea's knowledge of the Lord ; The covenant as connubial relationship ; Hesed and Emeth ; Ideal Israel ; The remnant ; Isaiah's knowledge of the Lord ; The Covenant as filial relationship ; The rebellion against a natural law The Messianic attribute ; The misinterpretation of the Messianic prophecy ; Jeremiah's knowledge of the Lord ; The term Emunah ; Habakkuk's principle of Emunah ; The definition of this term ; Jeremiah's disappointment ; His doctrine of individual responsibility ; Israel divorced ; Their claim of filial relationship ; The difference between Hosea and Jeremiah ; Belief and knowledge ; Jeremiah's own definition of the knowledge of the Lord ; The knowledge of the Lord gained by human experience ; Faith in the ancestors ; The fifth commandment ; Propagation of national creeds among other nations ; The testimony of written documents ; The ethical value f knowledge gained by experience ; The short-lived nature of Israel's faith ; Israel's faith in the Lord compared with that of Abraham ; The faith on evidence of a cumulative nature ; The religious conceptions of love and fear ; The ephemeral nature of empiric knowledge ; The want of faith ; Israel's faith in the non-Israelitish creeds ; Israel's claim to the property of their ancestors ; The guilt of the corrupt worshippers of Jahveh compared with that of the apostates ; The firm belief in Jahveh's power ; Superstition ; The prophets challenged to verify their predictions ; The fundamental import of the conditional nature of prophecy ; The plea of repentance ; Isaiah's induction into the prophetic office ; The obscure contents of his message ; The New Testament interpretation ; Isaiah's activity out of harmony with his induction ; The doom of Northern Israel ; No justification for a message of doom ; The survival of Israel ; The holy seed ; Jahveh's righteous anger ; The part of a seducer
  • IV : The prohibition of prophetic activities ; The danger to the ruling classes ; The force of habits ; The priests of the Jahveh-sanctuaries ; The leaders of fashion ; The ubiquit5y of moral corruption in the past ; Imitation of heathen customs ; The principle of equality ; Its renunciation ; The rise of a nobility ; The feudal system in Israel ; Inequality the fundament of Israel and Judah ; Equality the prophetic principle ; The nobility in post-exilic times ; The non-realizaiton of the prophetic ideals ; Aristocracy and Democracy ; Religion the most effective force in human affairs ; The prophetic testimony to the general oppression of the poor ; The intemperate habits and the debauchery of the wealthy classes ; Their defense of the state ; Foreign mercenaries ; The overthrow of aristocratic states by Assyria ; The carrying of the leading classes into captivity by Sargon ; The Israelites invited by Hezekiah to participate in the celebration of Passover ; The precarious condition of Judah in case of foreign aggression ; The social condition of Athens in the 7th century ; Solon's social reforms ; A great religious lesson in history ; The principles of justice and righteousness easy of realization ; Zedekiah's covenant with the people ; The breaking of this covenant ; An unprecedented crime ; The submission of the common people to the nobility ; The nobility left behind in Judah after the first captivity ; Ezekiel's testimony ; The impression of the first captivity on the common people ; The idolatrous practices of the Judeans in Egypt ; Their answer to Jeremiah ; The breaking of the covenant by the idolatrous nobility ; Their cruelty toward their own peers in captivity ; The territorial conception of Jahveh's power ; The condition of the captives in Babylon ; The universalistic principle of Ezekiel ; The celestial and terrestrial kingdoms compared ; The modern misconception of the prophetic universalistic principle ; The hypocrisy of the nobility
  • V : The prosperity of Israel and Judah ; The accession of Tiglathpileser IV ; The Western confederacy against Assyria ; Judah not a member of this confederacy ; Menahem's submission to Assyria ; The condition of Israel ; The rebellion against Menahem ; The geographical position of Tiphsah ; The people's approval of Zechariah's murder ; Menahem's cruel treatment of the rebels ; The reason for Menahem's joining the confederacy ; The confirmation of his kingdom by Assyria ; The consequence of his defection ; The years of his reign ; The murder of Pekahiah ; The feud between the two Joseph-tribes Ephraim and Manasseh ; Pekah's precarious condition as the murderer of Pekahiah ; His alliance with Rezin king of Aram ; Their intention to revive the Western confederacy ; Judah's refusal to join them ; The social conditions of Israel compared with those of Judah ; The effect of dynastic changes ; The military system of Assyria ; The change of dynasties in North-Israel ; The long duration of the Jehu-dynasty ; The denunciation of the nobility by Amos ; Israel being in more need of his activity than Judah ; Hosea's views of Judah ; Menahem's new nobility ; The permanency of Judah's nobility ; Judah's caste-system ; The Am-Haares ; The aliens in Judah ; Their religion ; Their treatment ; Their influence ; The mercenaries in Judah ; The Carians ; Their assistance at the overthrow of Athaliah ; Arabian mercenaries ; Hezekiah's pious warriors ; The Rechabites ; The foreign priests ; The etymology of Komer ; The term Chaldean ; The Philistine oracles ; The belief in foreign soothsayers an economic problem ; The engagement of foreign diviners ; The separate functions of the Kohanim and Kemarim ; An illustration of their positions
  • VI : The position of the Levitical priesthood ; The Levitical towns ; The acquisition of property by Levites ; The tribal distinctions under the monarchy ; Priestly descent a curse ; The Levites condemned to a life of penury ; The curse pronounced against Simeon and Levi ; The idea of this curse ; The priestly position of the Levites in Egypt ; Levi's blessing by Moses ; Simeon and Levi individuals ; Levi deeply impressed by his father's curse ; The story of Micah ; Levi's consecration as priest in Jacob's tribal sanctuary ; The succession of his children as priests ; The fate of Simeon ; The conquest of Jerusalem ; This city apportioned to the tribe of Simeon ; The reconquest of this city by the Jebusites ; The nigh annihilation of the tribe of Simeon ; The refuge of the remnants of this tribe among the Judeans ; Judah separated from the other tribes by a Canaanitic belt ; The emigrations of the Simeonites ; The high-priestly office in the temple of Shiloh ; The two priestly clans Eleazar and Ithamar ; The high priest Eli ; The priestly towns of the Aaronides ; The high priest Abiathar ; The priestly town Anathoth in Benjamin ; The seat of the chief sanctuary ; The home of the high priests Eleazar and Phinehas ; Gibeath-Phinehas ; The separation of Judah from the other tribes ; The reversion of the high-priestly office to the younger line ; The genealogy of the high priests ; The Judean chief sanctuary Hebron ; The high priest Zadok ; The chief sanctuary of Gibeon ; The poverty of the Levites ; The wealth of the priesthoods in all other countries ; The acquisition of landed property by the sanctuary ; The treasures of the temple of Jerusalem as national property ; The income of the priests ; The rise and fall of their fortunes ; Their pride on their priestly rank and descent ; Their material condition during a period of apostasy ; Israel under the influence of the Canaanitic civilization ; The lawgiver's provision for such an emergency ; His experiences in the wilderness ; The survival of Israel's religion in Canaan ; The priestly struggle for existence ; The spiritual superiority no cause for envy ; The reconfirmation of the ancient position of the Levites ; Israel a "kingdom of priests" ; The priestly rank of the first-born ; The Levites responding to the call of Moses ; The chronological order of the priestly ordinances ; The priestly rank cause of envy ; Korah's revolt ; The chiefs of the clans claiming the priestly prerogative ; The priestly ordinances prevention of envy ; The immigration of the Levites into Judah ; Levi's blessing by Moses ; Its reference to their substance and warlike qualities ; Judah's blessing by Moses ; The sympathy of the Levites with the poorer classes ; The governing classes of Judah
  • VII : Isaiah's family ; His induction into the prophetic office ; The other prophets ; The interpretation of Isaiah's message ; Isaiah as champion of righteousness, an aristocrat ; His belief in the divine right of the Davidic dynasty ; His doctrine of a remnant ; The stump of Jesse ; Deeds judged by environments ; Isaiah's protest against the high position of Shebna ; The cuneiform Shaphel-formatin of the name Shebna ; The first position of Shebna as a royal scribe ; His enmity toward Assyria ; His negotiation with Merodach-baladan ; The approval of Shebna's policy by the anti-Assyrian party ; Isaiah's opposition to foreign entanglements ; His rise as champion of the hereditary privileges of the nobility ; Shebna's successor as royal steward Eliakim ; The aggravation of corruption and injustice under Shebna's stewardship ; Micah's accusation of the ruling classes ; The removal of Shebna as royal steward ; A parallel between the Judean Isaiah and the Athenian Solon ; Democracy and Autocracy ; A dictator ; The autocratic Messiah ; Isaiah's belief in Hezekiah as king of righteousness ; The oracle against the Philistines ; Biblical chronology ; The date of Sennacherib's invasion of Judah ; The date of Hezekiah's illness ; The land of Immanuel ; Isaiah as tutor of Hezekiah ; The military force of this king ; His religious conduct ; His character ; Isaiah's disappointment ; His belief in the destiny of the house of David still strong; Micah's expectation of a righteous ruler ; Hezekiah's alliance with Egypt ; The conquest of Egypt the chief aim of Assyria ; Egypt's claim to the Syrian dominions ; The policy of the Egyptian kings ; The safety of Egypt ; The leading classes in the Western states bribed by Egypt ; Hezekiah subsidized by Egypt ; His embassy to Egypt ; His disloyal nobility ; The Ethiopian 25th dynasty ; Hezekiah's intention of entering into an alliance with Egypt during Sargon's reign ; Isaiah's oracle against Egypt ; Egypt's intrigues with Hezekiah after Sargon's death ; Shebna's negotiations with Merodach-baladan ; The latter's embassy to Hezekiah ; Its purpose ; Hezekiah's boast of his resources ; The danger of this boast ; Hezekiah concluding alliances without consulting the prophet ; The prophet ridiculed ; Hezekiah's implicit trust in the Lord ; The corruption of the nobility known to this king ; An autocratic state judged by the conduct of the king ; This conception generally held ; Judah's condition after Sennacherib's retreat ; Hezekiah's trust in the Lord in vain ; The religious condition aggravated by this conception ; The second illness of Hezekiah ; Hezekiah's tribute to Sennacherib ; Isaiah's description of this period ; The belief in the God of Israel undermined ; The religious conditions under the reign of Manasseh ; His hatred toward the Lord and His votaries ; An historical parallel ; Josiah's zeal in his reforms ; His restoration of the United Kingdom ; The establishing of his reforms in Samaria ; The refusal of the Ephraimitic priests to submit to the Mosaic law ; The return of the Ephraimites to the Mosaic religion before Josiah's reform ; The two periods of Jeremiah's activity ; His activity among the Ephraimites ; His collision with the Ephraimitic priesthood ; His appeal to Josiah ; His activity under the rule of this king ; His return to Judah after the death of Josiah ; His activity among the Ephraimites not in vain ; Religious ideas disseminated by force ; Josiah's covenant imposed upon the ruling class ; The seed sown by Manesseh ; The fate of the most righteous king ; The re-appearance of idolatry and corruption ; The people's conception of religion ; The battle of Megiddo ; Josiah's military exploit ; His perfect trust upon the Lord ; His ignorance of the real conditions ; His challenge ; The power of the Lord tested ; The real event of Megiddo ; Josiah murdered ; A pro-Egyptian version of this event ; The religious conduct of Josiah's successors ; Josiah an idealistic dreamer ; The discovery of the Mosaic code questioned ; Jehoiakim's policy with regard to the Jahveh-worship ; The reign of Jehoiachin ; The non-recognition of Zedekiah as legitimate king
  • VIII : The western confederacy ; Judah's refusal to join it ; Its reason known to the allies ; Their intention of overthrowing the Davidic dynasty ; Its results ; The realization of the prophetic teachings ; The danger to the religion of Israel ; Isaiah aligning himself with the Davidic dynasty ; The position of the Levitical priests ; The joy of the common people ; The former slogan of the rebels ; The depredations of the allies in Judah ; The softly flowing waters of Shiloah ; The new social order ; Its ephemeral character ; The arrival of the Assyrian army ; The son of Tabeel ; Tiglathpileser's campaign in Armenia ; His aid invoked by Ahaz ; The unbelief of Ahaz in Isaiah's divine message ; His fears ; Tiglathpileser received as benefactor ; Isaiah's description of his speedy arrival ; The outcome of Isaiah's advice if heeded by Ahaz ; The impression from the narrative of the Syro-Ephraimitic invasion ; The version of the Book of Chronicles ; Its historical sources ; The battle of Pekah against the Judean army ; The siege and conquest of Elath by Rezin ; Pekah's first siege of Jerusalem ; The second siege by the united forces of Aram and Israel ; The last six chapters of the Book of Zechariah ; The overwhelming evidence for their pre-exilic origin ; Their reference to the Syro-Ephraimitic invasion of Judah ; Judah an unwilling ally ; The views of the pre-exilic prophet ; His reference to the unsuccessful siege of Jerusalem ; The retreat of the allies ; The confusion in their armies ; The Judeans recognizing the hand of the Lord ; The attack of the Judeans on the retreating allies ; The peace between the Judeans and the Davidic dynasty ; The sally of the besieged ; The execution of the royal prince, royal steward, and grand vizier by the rebels ; The general public mourning for the royal prince ; The cutting off of three shepherds in one month ; Prophetic interpretations of historical reminiscences ; The pre-exilic prophet Zechariah son of Jeberechiah ; The faithful witness ; Chapter 14 ; Two prophecies mixed up ; The two tails of smoking firebrands ; Rezin and Pekah heads of the ruling classes and not of their nations ; Ahaz declining the prophet's offer of a sign ; Its reason ; The prophet's answer ; The former devotion of the Judeans to the house of David ; Their patience exhausted ; The prediction of Immanuel's birth ; The fulfillment of the prophecies ; The captivity of the East-Jordan and Galilean tribes ; The negotiations of Ahaz with Assyria unknown to Isaiah ; The separation of Ephraim from Judah ; The separation of the Judeans from Jerusalem ; A comparison of chapter 7 with chapter 8 ; The ambiguous legend maher-shalal-hash-baz ; The faithful witness ; The legend written in Hebrew and Aramaic ; The tablet to be exposed ; The naming of the prophet's son ; The overthrow of Damascus and Samaria ; The punishment of the Judeans in the near future ; The waters of Shiloah compared with the many and mighty waters of the Euphrates ; The pro-Assyrian and the pro-Allies parties ; Isaiah denounced by both parties ; The sanctification of the Lord's name ; Isaiah denounced by both parties ; The sanctification of the Lord's name ; Isaiah discredited in the eyes of the people ; The prophet's hope ; The living words of the Lord ; The binding up of the attestation and sealing of the oracle ; The current belief in necromancy ; Its practice prohibited ; A true oracle ; The prophet being challenged ; His activity in vain
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xviii pages, 1 leaf, 362 pages
Lccn
39000579
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)856612
Label
The priests and prophets,, by Jacob Hoschander
Link
http://hdl.handle.net/2027/uc1.$b8428
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • I : The priestly class Kemarim ; The abolition of their priestly office ; Solomon's foreign sanctuaries ; Their purpose ; The foreign priests of these sanctuaries ; The ancestral religion of the Canaanites under Solomon's reign ; Their status as aliens ; Their treatment ; Their support of Jeroboam ; The Aryan Hittites ; Their religious influence ; The Hittite bull-god ; The Baalim-worship ; Jeroboam's syncretisitc Jahveh-worship ; The religious attitudes of the Israelites ; Jeroboam's Canaanitic military force ; His election ; The loyal adherents of the Davidic dynasty in North-Israel ; The recoginition of the Canaanites as equal citizens ; Their anomalous position among the Israelites ; The amalgamation of the Canaanitic and Israelitish creeds ; Jeroboams's own religious conception ; The identification of Jahveh with Baal ; The Baalim representatives and emanations of the ancient supreme god of Palestine ; Historical parallels in Israel's history ; The priests of Jeroboam's sanctuaries ; The priestly rank of kings and chiefs ; The Festival of Jahveh as God of agriculture in the 8th month ; The position of the Vernal Equinox in Taurus ; The Asheroth and Asherim ; No Asherah in Jeroboam's sanctuaries ; His innovations of a ritual character ; The veneration of his memory by the pious Jehu-dynasty ; The attitude of the prophets toward his innovation ; The origin of the Mosaic rituals ; The three religious stages ; The Mosaic Monotheism ; State-monotheism and National monotheism ; The identification of the Baalim with the host of heaven ; The Heavenly Court in the visions of the prophets ; Jeremiah's monotheistic conception ; Deutero-Isaiah's rigid monotheism ; The belief in angels and Monotheism ; Zechariah's and Daniel's conception of angels ; The definition of angels by Maimonides
  • II : The popular conception of religion ; The prophetic teachings ; The ill success of the prophetic activity ; Isaiah's view on sacrifices and rituals ; Ritualistic performances by immoral persons ; The breach between the prophets and the priests ; Idealism versus realism ; The liberal attitude of the priests ; The piety of Judean kings due to their influence ; Their chief function of teaching ; Their teaching for hire ; The protest of Micah ; The ignorance of the poor ; The priestly principle of Truth and Peach ; Different views concerning external forms of worship ; The divine origin of the priestly ordinances ; The statement of Amos on sacrifices ; Its various interpretations Hosea's view ; The erroneous interpretation of Isaiah's views on rituals ; Micah's position ; His fundamental religious principles ; Psalm 15 ; Micah's Messianic message ; Jeremiah's conception concerning sacrifices ; Its correct interpretation ; His exhortation on Sabbath-observance ; The priestly prophet Joel ; His concern for the regularity of sacrifices ; The date of the drought ; Jeremiah's reference to the same event ; A comparison of Jeremiah's address with that of Joel ; Joel a true representative of the priests ; His style ; The criterion of a true prophet ; The conditional nature of prophecy ; The priestly prophet Ezekiel
  • III : The conception of piety and religious devotion in antiquity ; Moral conduct as the consequence of religious observances ; Demands beyond human power ; An excessive number of rituals ; The symbolic character of rituals ; A perfect state of human society ; The fear of punishment ; The principle "Fear of the Lord" ; Its rare occurrence in the prophetic literature ; The knowledge of the Lord ; The investigation of its meaning ; Hosea's knowledge of the Lord ; The covenant as connubial relationship ; Hesed and Emeth ; Ideal Israel ; The remnant ; Isaiah's knowledge of the Lord ; The Covenant as filial relationship ; The rebellion against a natural law The Messianic attribute ; The misinterpretation of the Messianic prophecy ; Jeremiah's knowledge of the Lord ; The term Emunah ; Habakkuk's principle of Emunah ; The definition of this term ; Jeremiah's disappointment ; His doctrine of individual responsibility ; Israel divorced ; Their claim of filial relationship ; The difference between Hosea and Jeremiah ; Belief and knowledge ; Jeremiah's own definition of the knowledge of the Lord ; The knowledge of the Lord gained by human experience ; Faith in the ancestors ; The fifth commandment ; Propagation of national creeds among other nations ; The testimony of written documents ; The ethical value f knowledge gained by experience ; The short-lived nature of Israel's faith ; Israel's faith in the Lord compared with that of Abraham ; The faith on evidence of a cumulative nature ; The religious conceptions of love and fear ; The ephemeral nature of empiric knowledge ; The want of faith ; Israel's faith in the non-Israelitish creeds ; Israel's claim to the property of their ancestors ; The guilt of the corrupt worshippers of Jahveh compared with that of the apostates ; The firm belief in Jahveh's power ; Superstition ; The prophets challenged to verify their predictions ; The fundamental import of the conditional nature of prophecy ; The plea of repentance ; Isaiah's induction into the prophetic office ; The obscure contents of his message ; The New Testament interpretation ; Isaiah's activity out of harmony with his induction ; The doom of Northern Israel ; No justification for a message of doom ; The survival of Israel ; The holy seed ; Jahveh's righteous anger ; The part of a seducer
  • IV : The prohibition of prophetic activities ; The danger to the ruling classes ; The force of habits ; The priests of the Jahveh-sanctuaries ; The leaders of fashion ; The ubiquit5y of moral corruption in the past ; Imitation of heathen customs ; The principle of equality ; Its renunciation ; The rise of a nobility ; The feudal system in Israel ; Inequality the fundament of Israel and Judah ; Equality the prophetic principle ; The nobility in post-exilic times ; The non-realizaiton of the prophetic ideals ; Aristocracy and Democracy ; Religion the most effective force in human affairs ; The prophetic testimony to the general oppression of the poor ; The intemperate habits and the debauchery of the wealthy classes ; Their defense of the state ; Foreign mercenaries ; The overthrow of aristocratic states by Assyria ; The carrying of the leading classes into captivity by Sargon ; The Israelites invited by Hezekiah to participate in the celebration of Passover ; The precarious condition of Judah in case of foreign aggression ; The social condition of Athens in the 7th century ; Solon's social reforms ; A great religious lesson in history ; The principles of justice and righteousness easy of realization ; Zedekiah's covenant with the people ; The breaking of this covenant ; An unprecedented crime ; The submission of the common people to the nobility ; The nobility left behind in Judah after the first captivity ; Ezekiel's testimony ; The impression of the first captivity on the common people ; The idolatrous practices of the Judeans in Egypt ; Their answer to Jeremiah ; The breaking of the covenant by the idolatrous nobility ; Their cruelty toward their own peers in captivity ; The territorial conception of Jahveh's power ; The condition of the captives in Babylon ; The universalistic principle of Ezekiel ; The celestial and terrestrial kingdoms compared ; The modern misconception of the prophetic universalistic principle ; The hypocrisy of the nobility
  • V : The prosperity of Israel and Judah ; The accession of Tiglathpileser IV ; The Western confederacy against Assyria ; Judah not a member of this confederacy ; Menahem's submission to Assyria ; The condition of Israel ; The rebellion against Menahem ; The geographical position of Tiphsah ; The people's approval of Zechariah's murder ; Menahem's cruel treatment of the rebels ; The reason for Menahem's joining the confederacy ; The confirmation of his kingdom by Assyria ; The consequence of his defection ; The years of his reign ; The murder of Pekahiah ; The feud between the two Joseph-tribes Ephraim and Manasseh ; Pekah's precarious condition as the murderer of Pekahiah ; His alliance with Rezin king of Aram ; Their intention to revive the Western confederacy ; Judah's refusal to join them ; The social conditions of Israel compared with those of Judah ; The effect of dynastic changes ; The military system of Assyria ; The change of dynasties in North-Israel ; The long duration of the Jehu-dynasty ; The denunciation of the nobility by Amos ; Israel being in more need of his activity than Judah ; Hosea's views of Judah ; Menahem's new nobility ; The permanency of Judah's nobility ; Judah's caste-system ; The Am-Haares ; The aliens in Judah ; Their religion ; Their treatment ; Their influence ; The mercenaries in Judah ; The Carians ; Their assistance at the overthrow of Athaliah ; Arabian mercenaries ; Hezekiah's pious warriors ; The Rechabites ; The foreign priests ; The etymology of Komer ; The term Chaldean ; The Philistine oracles ; The belief in foreign soothsayers an economic problem ; The engagement of foreign diviners ; The separate functions of the Kohanim and Kemarim ; An illustration of their positions
  • VI : The position of the Levitical priesthood ; The Levitical towns ; The acquisition of property by Levites ; The tribal distinctions under the monarchy ; Priestly descent a curse ; The Levites condemned to a life of penury ; The curse pronounced against Simeon and Levi ; The idea of this curse ; The priestly position of the Levites in Egypt ; Levi's blessing by Moses ; Simeon and Levi individuals ; Levi deeply impressed by his father's curse ; The story of Micah ; Levi's consecration as priest in Jacob's tribal sanctuary ; The succession of his children as priests ; The fate of Simeon ; The conquest of Jerusalem ; This city apportioned to the tribe of Simeon ; The reconquest of this city by the Jebusites ; The nigh annihilation of the tribe of Simeon ; The refuge of the remnants of this tribe among the Judeans ; Judah separated from the other tribes by a Canaanitic belt ; The emigrations of the Simeonites ; The high-priestly office in the temple of Shiloh ; The two priestly clans Eleazar and Ithamar ; The high priest Eli ; The priestly towns of the Aaronides ; The high priest Abiathar ; The priestly town Anathoth in Benjamin ; The seat of the chief sanctuary ; The home of the high priests Eleazar and Phinehas ; Gibeath-Phinehas ; The separation of Judah from the other tribes ; The reversion of the high-priestly office to the younger line ; The genealogy of the high priests ; The Judean chief sanctuary Hebron ; The high priest Zadok ; The chief sanctuary of Gibeon ; The poverty of the Levites ; The wealth of the priesthoods in all other countries ; The acquisition of landed property by the sanctuary ; The treasures of the temple of Jerusalem as national property ; The income of the priests ; The rise and fall of their fortunes ; Their pride on their priestly rank and descent ; Their material condition during a period of apostasy ; Israel under the influence of the Canaanitic civilization ; The lawgiver's provision for such an emergency ; His experiences in the wilderness ; The survival of Israel's religion in Canaan ; The priestly struggle for existence ; The spiritual superiority no cause for envy ; The reconfirmation of the ancient position of the Levites ; Israel a "kingdom of priests" ; The priestly rank of the first-born ; The Levites responding to the call of Moses ; The chronological order of the priestly ordinances ; The priestly rank cause of envy ; Korah's revolt ; The chiefs of the clans claiming the priestly prerogative ; The priestly ordinances prevention of envy ; The immigration of the Levites into Judah ; Levi's blessing by Moses ; Its reference to their substance and warlike qualities ; Judah's blessing by Moses ; The sympathy of the Levites with the poorer classes ; The governing classes of Judah
  • VII : Isaiah's family ; His induction into the prophetic office ; The other prophets ; The interpretation of Isaiah's message ; Isaiah as champion of righteousness, an aristocrat ; His belief in the divine right of the Davidic dynasty ; His doctrine of a remnant ; The stump of Jesse ; Deeds judged by environments ; Isaiah's protest against the high position of Shebna ; The cuneiform Shaphel-formatin of the name Shebna ; The first position of Shebna as a royal scribe ; His enmity toward Assyria ; His negotiation with Merodach-baladan ; The approval of Shebna's policy by the anti-Assyrian party ; Isaiah's opposition to foreign entanglements ; His rise as champion of the hereditary privileges of the nobility ; Shebna's successor as royal steward Eliakim ; The aggravation of corruption and injustice under Shebna's stewardship ; Micah's accusation of the ruling classes ; The removal of Shebna as royal steward ; A parallel between the Judean Isaiah and the Athenian Solon ; Democracy and Autocracy ; A dictator ; The autocratic Messiah ; Isaiah's belief in Hezekiah as king of righteousness ; The oracle against the Philistines ; Biblical chronology ; The date of Sennacherib's invasion of Judah ; The date of Hezekiah's illness ; The land of Immanuel ; Isaiah as tutor of Hezekiah ; The military force of this king ; His religious conduct ; His character ; Isaiah's disappointment ; His belief in the destiny of the house of David still strong; Micah's expectation of a righteous ruler ; Hezekiah's alliance with Egypt ; The conquest of Egypt the chief aim of Assyria ; Egypt's claim to the Syrian dominions ; The policy of the Egyptian kings ; The safety of Egypt ; The leading classes in the Western states bribed by Egypt ; Hezekiah subsidized by Egypt ; His embassy to Egypt ; His disloyal nobility ; The Ethiopian 25th dynasty ; Hezekiah's intention of entering into an alliance with Egypt during Sargon's reign ; Isaiah's oracle against Egypt ; Egypt's intrigues with Hezekiah after Sargon's death ; Shebna's negotiations with Merodach-baladan ; The latter's embassy to Hezekiah ; Its purpose ; Hezekiah's boast of his resources ; The danger of this boast ; Hezekiah concluding alliances without consulting the prophet ; The prophet ridiculed ; Hezekiah's implicit trust in the Lord ; The corruption of the nobility known to this king ; An autocratic state judged by the conduct of the king ; This conception generally held ; Judah's condition after Sennacherib's retreat ; Hezekiah's trust in the Lord in vain ; The religious condition aggravated by this conception ; The second illness of Hezekiah ; Hezekiah's tribute to Sennacherib ; Isaiah's description of this period ; The belief in the God of Israel undermined ; The religious conditions under the reign of Manasseh ; His hatred toward the Lord and His votaries ; An historical parallel ; Josiah's zeal in his reforms ; His restoration of the United Kingdom ; The establishing of his reforms in Samaria ; The refusal of the Ephraimitic priests to submit to the Mosaic law ; The return of the Ephraimites to the Mosaic religion before Josiah's reform ; The two periods of Jeremiah's activity ; His activity among the Ephraimites ; His collision with the Ephraimitic priesthood ; His appeal to Josiah ; His activity under the rule of this king ; His return to Judah after the death of Josiah ; His activity among the Ephraimites not in vain ; Religious ideas disseminated by force ; Josiah's covenant imposed upon the ruling class ; The seed sown by Manesseh ; The fate of the most righteous king ; The re-appearance of idolatry and corruption ; The people's conception of religion ; The battle of Megiddo ; Josiah's military exploit ; His perfect trust upon the Lord ; His ignorance of the real conditions ; His challenge ; The power of the Lord tested ; The real event of Megiddo ; Josiah murdered ; A pro-Egyptian version of this event ; The religious conduct of Josiah's successors ; Josiah an idealistic dreamer ; The discovery of the Mosaic code questioned ; Jehoiakim's policy with regard to the Jahveh-worship ; The reign of Jehoiachin ; The non-recognition of Zedekiah as legitimate king
  • VIII : The western confederacy ; Judah's refusal to join it ; Its reason known to the allies ; Their intention of overthrowing the Davidic dynasty ; Its results ; The realization of the prophetic teachings ; The danger to the religion of Israel ; Isaiah aligning himself with the Davidic dynasty ; The position of the Levitical priests ; The joy of the common people ; The former slogan of the rebels ; The depredations of the allies in Judah ; The softly flowing waters of Shiloah ; The new social order ; Its ephemeral character ; The arrival of the Assyrian army ; The son of Tabeel ; Tiglathpileser's campaign in Armenia ; His aid invoked by Ahaz ; The unbelief of Ahaz in Isaiah's divine message ; His fears ; Tiglathpileser received as benefactor ; Isaiah's description of his speedy arrival ; The outcome of Isaiah's advice if heeded by Ahaz ; The impression from the narrative of the Syro-Ephraimitic invasion ; The version of the Book of Chronicles ; Its historical sources ; The battle of Pekah against the Judean army ; The siege and conquest of Elath by Rezin ; Pekah's first siege of Jerusalem ; The second siege by the united forces of Aram and Israel ; The last six chapters of the Book of Zechariah ; The overwhelming evidence for their pre-exilic origin ; Their reference to the Syro-Ephraimitic invasion of Judah ; Judah an unwilling ally ; The views of the pre-exilic prophet ; His reference to the unsuccessful siege of Jerusalem ; The retreat of the allies ; The confusion in their armies ; The Judeans recognizing the hand of the Lord ; The attack of the Judeans on the retreating allies ; The peace between the Judeans and the Davidic dynasty ; The sally of the besieged ; The execution of the royal prince, royal steward, and grand vizier by the rebels ; The general public mourning for the royal prince ; The cutting off of three shepherds in one month ; Prophetic interpretations of historical reminiscences ; The pre-exilic prophet Zechariah son of Jeberechiah ; The faithful witness ; Chapter 14 ; Two prophecies mixed up ; The two tails of smoking firebrands ; Rezin and Pekah heads of the ruling classes and not of their nations ; Ahaz declining the prophet's offer of a sign ; Its reason ; The prophet's answer ; The former devotion of the Judeans to the house of David ; Their patience exhausted ; The prediction of Immanuel's birth ; The fulfillment of the prophecies ; The captivity of the East-Jordan and Galilean tribes ; The negotiations of Ahaz with Assyria unknown to Isaiah ; The separation of Ephraim from Judah ; The separation of the Judeans from Jerusalem ; A comparison of chapter 7 with chapter 8 ; The ambiguous legend maher-shalal-hash-baz ; The faithful witness ; The legend written in Hebrew and Aramaic ; The tablet to be exposed ; The naming of the prophet's son ; The overthrow of Damascus and Samaria ; The punishment of the Judeans in the near future ; The waters of Shiloah compared with the many and mighty waters of the Euphrates ; The pro-Assyrian and the pro-Allies parties ; Isaiah denounced by both parties ; The sanctification of the Lord's name ; Isaiah denounced by both parties ; The sanctification of the Lord's name ; Isaiah discredited in the eyes of the people ; The prophet's hope ; The living words of the Lord ; The binding up of the attestation and sealing of the oracle ; The current belief in necromancy ; Its practice prohibited ; A true oracle ; The prophet being challenged ; His activity in vain
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xviii pages, 1 leaf, 362 pages
Lccn
39000579
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)856612

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